Math

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  • Which mathematician had the biggest gap between fame and contribution?

    Computational Complexity
    22 Mar 2015 | 7:35 pm
    (I was going to call this entry  Who was the worst mathematician of all time? but Clyde Kruskal reminded me that its not (say) Goldbach's fault that his conjecture got so well known, in fact its a good thing! I'll come back to Goldbach later.) Would Hawking be as well known if he didn't have ALS?  I suspect that within Physics yes, but I doubt he would have had guest shots on ST:TNG, The Simpsons, Futurama, and The Big Bang Theory (I just checked the IDMB database- they don't mention Futurama but they do say he's a Capricorn. I find that appalling that they mention a Scientists…
  • Mathematicians solve 60-year old-problem

    Mathematics News -- ScienceDaily
    23 Mar 2015 | 12:06 pm
    A 60-year old maths problem first put forward by Nobel laureate Enrico Fermi has finally been solved. In 1955, a team of physicists, computer scientists and mathematicians led by Fermi used a computer for the first time to try and solve a numerical experiment. The outcome of the experiment wasn't what they were expecting, and the complexity of the problem underpinned the then new field of non-linear physics and paved the way for six decades of new thinking. Chaos theory, popularly referred to as the butterfly effect, is just one of the theories developed to try and solve the…
  • A Few of My Favorite Spaces: The Cantor Set

    Scientific American - Math
    26 Mar 2015 | 5:30 am
    Last month, I wrote about the -Base, a website that serves a similar function to the book Counterexamples in Topology. I'm teaching a topology class this semester, and it's been fun to revisit some... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
  • News Aplenty

    Computational Complexity
    25 Mar 2015 | 11:10 am
    Both the Turing Award and the Abel Prize were announced this morning. MIT databases researcher Michael Stonebraker wins the ACM Turing Award. He developed INGRES one of the first relational databases. Stonebraker is the first Turing award winner since the prize went up to a cool million dollars. John Nash and Louis Nirenberg share this years Abel Prize “for striking and seminal contributions to the theory of nonlinear partial differential equations and its applications to geometric analysis.” This work on PDEs is completely independent from the equilibrium results that won Nash…
  • Quantum compute this: Mathematicians build code to take on toughest of cyber attacks

    Mathematics News -- ScienceDaily
    26 Mar 2015 | 8:24 am
    Mathematicians have designed an encryption code capable of fending off the phenomenal hacking power of a quantum computer. Using high-level number theory and cryptography, the researchers reworked an infamous old cipher called the knapsack code to create an online security system better prepared for future demands.
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    MATH - Google News

  • Choate to dedicate new math, computer science building - New Haven Register

    26 Mar 2015 | 4:47 pm
    Choate to dedicate new math, computer science buildingNew Haven RegisterWALLINGFORD >> Officials at Choate Rosemary Hall will dedicate a new math and computer science building Friday. The new Cameron and Edward Lanphier Center for Mathematics and Computer Science open early last month after construction of the ...
  • Ravens' John Urschel NFL Pro By Day, Math Wiz By Night - CBS Local

    26 Mar 2015 | 1:39 pm
    CBS LocalRavens' John Urschel NFL Pro By Day, Math Wiz By NightCBS LocalUrschel has three degrees in math including two masters. He graduated from Penn State in just three years with a perfect 4.0 and he's known to use his math skills to analyze the team's performance. “If Harbaugh is talking about something and it John Urschel Of Baltimore Ravens Balances Football With MathTech TimesRavens Offensive Lineman John Urschel Explains His Mathematics PaperForbesall 3 news articles »
  • Virginia awards $1.6M to boost teacher science, math - The Daily Progress

    26 Mar 2015 | 10:27 am
    Cody EnterpriseVirginia awards $1.6M to boost teacher science, mathThe Daily ProgressRICHMOND — The Virginia Department of Education is awarding more than $1.6 million in grants to enhance teachers' knowledge of science and math and their ability to teach the subjects. The department said in a release that nine partnerships between ...Panhandle students tally wins at Regional Math Field DayHerald-Mail MediaSunset School Math NightCody EnterpriseMath Super Bowl played todayPorterville RecorderPost-Bulletin -SW News Mediaall 3,001 news articles »
  • Some Pick at Math in New York City Affordable-Housing Strategy - Wall Street Journal

    26 Mar 2015 | 8:44 am
    Wall Street JournalSome Pick at Math in New York City Affordable-Housing StrategyWall Street JournalIn many neighborhoods, Mayor Bill de Blasio's plan to spur construction of affordable apartments by allowing developers to build towers may face an unusual problem in New York City: The rent is too low. City Hall plans to let developers build taller and more »
  • Front Row Education Is Changing The Way Math Is Taught In U.S. Elementary ... - Forbes

    26 Mar 2015 | 8:32 am
    ForbesFront Row Education Is Changing The Way Math Is Taught In U.S. Elementary ForbesIn 2013, Sidharth Kakkar and Alexandr Kurilin had the opportunity to watch children learning math in an inner-city Baltimore school. For a month, they attended to school every day and worked with students. At night, they programmed to make an
 
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    Search for "math OR mathematics"

  • Jazz bigs Derrick Favors and Rudy Gobert need help from the line from Karl Malone and Mehmet Okur

    26 Mar 2015 | 10:28 pm
    The Jazz don't have to look far in their rolodex to find the right guys to help Derrick and Rudy's free throw shooting woes Over the last season many people concerned with the Utah Jazz have been concerned with the free throw shooting. And there's good reason to be concerned.
  • Dominion announces $1.5 million in scholarships

    26 Mar 2015 | 10:27 pm
    Dominion announced Tuesday it will begin accepting applications for over $1.5 million in educational program grants focusing on energy, the environment and conservation. Schools in areas served by Dominion - including Virginia, parts of Ohio and upstate New York - are eligible to apply for the grants.
  • LUHS February students, teacher of the month

    26 Mar 2015 | 10:24 pm
    Kamryn Dixon is a recipient of the Mathematics Student of the Month Award. Kamryn, a sophomore, is performing at an exceptionally high level in Advanced Algebra.
  • Student eating habits influence learning

    26 Mar 2015 | 10:22 pm
    Research on students shows that starting the day off with a meal means a mind that's ready to learn and in Wicomico County, this proves true. The food service staff of Wicomico County Public Schools serves more than 1,900 breakfasts and more than 7,200 lunches to students every day.
  • Google hearts the MidEast - Oodles of Google Doodles prove it

    26 Mar 2015 | 10:19 pm
    Image 1 of 18: Egyptian designer Shadi Abdel Salam created costumes, stage sets, and screenplays, working on some of Egypt's most famous historical films before moving to the director's chair. Born in Alexandria in 1930 , he trained in theater arts and architecture.
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    Mathematics News -- ScienceDaily

  • Quantum compute this: Mathematicians build code to take on toughest of cyber attacks

    26 Mar 2015 | 8:24 am
    Mathematicians have designed an encryption code capable of fending off the phenomenal hacking power of a quantum computer. Using high-level number theory and cryptography, the researchers reworked an infamous old cipher called the knapsack code to create an online security system better prepared for future demands.
  • Mathematicians solve 60-year old-problem

    23 Mar 2015 | 12:06 pm
    A 60-year old maths problem first put forward by Nobel laureate Enrico Fermi has finally been solved. In 1955, a team of physicists, computer scientists and mathematicians led by Fermi used a computer for the first time to try and solve a numerical experiment. The outcome of the experiment wasn't what they were expecting, and the complexity of the problem underpinned the then new field of non-linear physics and paved the way for six decades of new thinking. Chaos theory, popularly referred to as the butterfly effect, is just one of the theories developed to try and solve the…
  • Genetics of altruism: Is blood really thicker than water?

    23 Mar 2015 | 4:52 am
    The outcome of a duel between mathematical models supports the reigning theory of the genetics of altruism. Called inclusive fitness, it says altruism is competitive if it benefits relatives carrying the same gene as the selfless individual.
  • Cancer therapy 'tumor sanctuaries' and the breeding ground of resistance

    19 Mar 2015 | 11:33 am
    Tumors acquiring resistance is one of the major barriers to successful cancer therapy. Scientistst use mathematical models to characterize how important aspects of tumor microenvironment can impair the efficacy of targeted cancer therapies.
  • Nanostructure complex materials modeling

    18 Mar 2015 | 7:08 am
    Brookhaven physicists have illustrated how advances in computing and applied mathematics can improve the predictive value of models used to design new materials.
 
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    Scientific American - Math

  • A Few of My Favorite Spaces: The Cantor Set

    26 Mar 2015 | 5:30 am
    Last month, I wrote about the -Base, a website that serves a similar function to the book Counterexamples in Topology. I'm teaching a topology class this semester, and it's been fun to revisit some... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
  • The Science of TED 2015

    23 Mar 2015 | 7:00 am
    What I love about the annual TED gathering in Vancouver is the way science coexists along with art, social justice, popular song and the rest of TED's eclectic mix. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
  • What’s so Great about Continued Fractions?

    17 Mar 2015 | 5:30 am
    The more I learn about continued fractions, the more enamored I am with them. Last week, when I wrote about how much better continued fractions are than the arbitrary decimal digits we usually use to... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
  • The Best Pi Day Pies and Celebrations

    16 Mar 2015 | 1:45 pm
    Reader-submitted photos of pi pies, pizzas and parties to commemorate the Pi Day of the Century -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
  • Irrational Exuberance: How Will You Celebrate the Pi Day of the Century?

    14 Mar 2015 | 6:26 am
    Send us pix of your pies, pizzas and parties in honor of math (and circular baked goods) -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
 
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    Ars Mathematica

  • Nine Chapters on the Semigroup Art

    Walt
    28 Feb 2015 | 1:39 pm
    While Googling something or other, I came across Nine Chapters on the Semigroup Art, which is a leisurely introduction to the theory of semigroups. (While the document is labelled “lecture notes”, the typography is quite beautiful.)
  • What Did Grothendieck Do?

    Walt
    1 Jan 2015 | 1:56 pm
    Happy New Year! The publicity in the wake of Grothendieck’s death has left a certain number of non-mathematicians with the question of what it was exactly that he did. I wrote an answer elsewhere that people seemed to find informative, so I’m saving it here for posterity. This post is as untechnical as I could make it. Grothendieck’s work is incredibly technical, even by modern standards of abstract mathematics, so my description is, if you’re being charitable, highly impressionistic, and if you’re not, wrong in many major details. I also only discussed schemes…
  • Learning about Stochastic Processes the Almost Sure Way

    Walt
    9 Nov 2014 | 1:21 pm
    George Lowther at Almost Sure has written a terrific series of posts explaining stochastic processes and the stochastic calculus. Stochastic calculus is widely used in physics and finance, so there are many informal introductions that get across the main ideas in a form sufficient for applications. Most of the formal presentations of the subject seem very far away from the informal ones, to an unusual extent. For example, for the important technical notion of semimartingale the Wikipedia definition is the usual one, which has a very different flavor from the naive picture useful in…
  • Arguesian Lattices

    Walt
    23 Sep 2014 | 12:46 pm
    As is well-known, the lattice of submodules of a module is modular. What I did not know is that the converse is not true, and that lattices of submodules must satisfy a stronger property, the arguesian law. The Arguesian law is a lattice-theoretic analogue of Desargues’ theorem in projective geometry. I read the statement of the theorem several times and I have no intuition about what it means. There is a kind of converse to this result: a complemented lattice can be embedded into the lattice of submodules of a module if and only if it is arguesian. (I found the result in…
  • K2, not the mountain

    Walt
    20 Mar 2014 | 2:18 pm
    Chandan Singh Dalawat has a nice survey article about K2. It just gives the highlights of the theory, without proofs, so it’s closer to a teaser trailer than it is to full-length movie. But sometimes you just want a teaser trailer to tell you if you want to invest the time in the movie.
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    Loren on the Art of MATLAB

  • Bayesian Brain Teaser

    Loren Shure
    25 Mar 2015 | 11:41 am
    Winter in Boston can get quite cold. When we get a lot of snow, we need to take a break after shoveling, and solving puzzles is nice way to spend time indoors. Today's guest blogger, Toshi Takeuchi, gives you an interesting brain teaser, written during one of the many 2015 snowstorms in Boston.ContentsNate Silver and Bayesian ReasoningThe Monty Hall Problem - SimulationWhy Switching Is Better - Bayesian AnalysisNate Silver's MethodBayesian in Machine LearningIt's Your TurnNate Silver and Bayesian ReasoningIn The Signal and the Noise, the famed data scientist Nate Silver discusses the…
  • The Ultimate Pi Day is Over… Now What?

    Loren Shure
    16 Mar 2015 | 11:28 am
    Today's post is from guest blogger Dan Seal who works in the MATLAB Product Marketing team here at MathWorks. Dan recently celebrated Pi Day on 3/14/15 and wanted to know what other holidays he might be able to celebrate in the future.ContentsStarting smallDefining the possible date formatsExtracting the digitsBuilding the list of special datesPrinting out the resultsGeneralizing to a larger set of inputsNow it's your turnEvery year, mathematicians and their geeky cohort celebrate Pi Day on the fourteenth of March, a date whose written representation (3/14) looks like the first three digits…
  • MATLAB Data Types for Dates and Time, Part II

    Loren Shure
    11 Mar 2015 | 5:24 am
    Once again we're going to hear from guest blogger Andrea Ho, who works for the MATLAB Documentation team here at MathWorks.ContentsInterest Payments from a Swiss BankNot Every Day Has 24 HoursQuarterly StatisticsConvert Date Numbers to DatetimeYour Thoughts?Last time, I introduced new data types for representing date and time data in MATLAB: datetime for representing specific points in time, duration for representing exact differences between points in time, and calendarDuration for representing flexible amounts of time such as months. Today, we'll look at how these data types help you to…
  • Why “Where’s Waldo”?

    Loren Shure
    6 Mar 2015 | 8:16 am
    Today I'd like to introduce guest blogger Seth DeLand who works for the MATLAB Product Marketing team here at MathWorks. Today, Seth will be discussing some different optimization techniques that he used for developing a strategy for the puzzle-books "Where's Waldo?".ContentsFinding the shortest pathA different take on the shortest pathAnalyzing the solutionThere was a nice post on Randal Olson’s blog last week about techniques for the popular puzzle-books “Where's Waldo?” (originally “Where’' Wally?” in the UK).As a kid, I spent hours going through my…
  • Direct Access to Seismological Data using MATLAB

    Loren Shure
    3 Mar 2015 | 12:47 pm
    I've recently been engaged in several events of potential interest to the geophysics community. In December 2014, a few of us from MathWorks attended the AGU meeting (American Geophysical Union).And last week, I was invited to give a webinar to the IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) community. The video for MATLAB for Analyzing & Visualizing Geospatial Data is here.Next, I would like to pass on some timely information from Chad Trabant and Robert Weekly, from IRIS, about accessing seismological data via IRIS sites and services.ContentsIntroductionAccessing data from…
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    Homeschool Math Blog

  • New review of Math Mammoth

    21 Mar 2015 | 9:57 am
    I just got word about a new review of Math Mammoth, from Kate's Homeschool Math Help. The owner, Kate, has written helpful reviews and buying guides for Math Mammoth, Singapore Math, and RightStart Math. She also has lots of other tips for teaching math or choosing a homeschool math curriculum on her site. Kate says, "I'm a math educator turned homeschool mom. My mission is to help homeschool parents hone their teaching skills and teach math with confidence."Her Math Mammoth review is here.
  • Calculating Pi with Real Pies

    7 Mar 2015 | 6:20 am
    This is a neat video, showing how to calculate the value of Pi using real pies (yum!). It might help your youngsters remember the definition of Pi better as they remember the visual pic of pies around the big circle and pies going across. :) Remember also that Pi day (3/14) is upon us soon...
  • An easy lesson on square roots

    16 Feb 2015 | 9:28 am
    I've posted on my site a beginner video lesson on square roots. You can also watch it below: Finding a square root of a number is like finding the side of a square when the area is known. Square root symbol acts as a grouping symbol: anything under it is in parentheses and is solved first. I also solve a few problems involving area & perimeter of squares.I hope it's helpful!
  • Puzzle corner was too easy!

    13 Feb 2015 | 11:41 am
    One of my customers mentioned that this particular puzzle corner from Math Mammoth Grade 1-A was too easy for her son:I admit, it's kind of easy. But, like I told her, I'm sure some children enjoy having an easier puzzle corner in between the others because several people have mentioned they are challenging to their children.But, you can make it more challenging very easily: simply add a number to each equation... and possibly also make (some of) the numbers bigger. Check the examples athttp://www.mathmammoth.com/lessons/puzzle_corner_too_easy.php:)
  • Ratios & Proportions book has been updated!

    7 Feb 2015 | 8:30 am
    Math Mammoth Ratios, Proportions & Problem Solving is a worktext that concentrates, first of all, on two important concepts: ratios and proportions, and then on problem solving. It is meant for grades 6-7.This book has been now updated to include many new lessons that will ALSO be in the upcoming Math Mammoth grade 7-B. This means that you can use it to continue pre-algebra studies after finishing 7-A.See free samples and more info:http://www.mathmammoth.com/ratios_proportions_problem_solving.phpFor now, I've kept the download price at $5.00 though the book became quite a bit longer.
 
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    Let's Play Math!

  • Education Bloggers: Share Your Post!

    Denise Gaskins
    17 Mar 2015 | 10:06 am
    [Image by Omar Omar (CC BY 2.0) via Flickr.] Please Note: We need volunteers to host future carnivals! See below for more information. If you are a homeschooler or classroom teacher, student or independent learner, or anyone else who writes about math, now is the time to send in your favorite blog post for next week’s Math Teachers at Play (MTaP) math education blog carnival. Click here to submit your blog post. Browse all the past editions of the Math Teachers at Play blog carnival Have you noticed a new math blogger on your block that you’d like to introduce to the rest of us? Feel…
  • For the Curmudgeons: Vi Hart’s Anti-Pi Rant

    Denise Gaskins
    14 Mar 2015 | 7:26 am
    More about Tau: Happy Tau Day Get monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions. Sign up for my Tabletop Academy Press Updates email list.
  • Happy Birthday, General Relativity

    Denise Gaskins
    14 Mar 2015 | 4:55 am
    Don’t forget that Pi Day is also Albert Einstein’s birthday! And this year marks the 100th anniversary of his Theory of General Relativity. So Science Magazine has a special Einstein issue online, featuring this interactive comic: You may also enjoy: the Happy Birthday, Einstein! video series Happy Birthday, Einstein (Part 2) Happy Birthday, Einstein (Part 3) Happy Birthday, Einstein (Part 4) Albert Einstein’s math biography Math-related quotes from Albert Einstein Get monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or…
  • Pi: Who Needs That Many Digits?

    Denise Gaskins
    13 Mar 2015 | 4:50 am
    From Numberphile: Pi is famously calculated to trillions of digits – but Dr. James Grime says 39 is enough. How you round it off makes a difference: An extra note from Dr. Grime: “Since pi39 ends in 0, you may think we could use pi38 instead, which has even fewer digits. Unfortunately, the rounding errors of pi38 are ten times larger than the rounding errors of pi39 — more than a hydrogen atom. So that extra decimal place makes a difference, even if it’s 0.” Get monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales…
  • Pi and Buffon’s Matches

    Denise Gaskins
    12 Mar 2015 | 9:29 am
    From Numberphile: Dr Tony Padilla’s unique (and low budget) twist on the Buffon’s Needle experiment to learn the true value of Pi. For a kid-friendly version of this experiment, try throwing food: How to Calculate Pi by Throwing Frozen Hot Dogs Do you have a favorite family activity for celebrating Pi Day? I’d love to hear it! Get monthly math tips and activity ideas, and be the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions. Sign up for my Tabletop Academy Press Updates email list.
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    Computational Complexity

  • News Aplenty

    25 Mar 2015 | 11:10 am
    Both the Turing Award and the Abel Prize were announced this morning. MIT databases researcher Michael Stonebraker wins the ACM Turing Award. He developed INGRES one of the first relational databases. Stonebraker is the first Turing award winner since the prize went up to a cool million dollars. John Nash and Louis Nirenberg share this years Abel Prize “for striking and seminal contributions to the theory of nonlinear partial differential equations and its applications to geometric analysis.” This work on PDEs is completely independent from the equilibrium results that won Nash…
  • Which mathematician had the biggest gap between fame and contribution?

    22 Mar 2015 | 7:35 pm
    (I was going to call this entry  Who was the worst mathematician of all time? but Clyde Kruskal reminded me that its not (say) Goldbach's fault that his conjecture got so well known, in fact its a good thing! I'll come back to Goldbach later.) Would Hawking be as well known if he didn't have ALS?  I suspect that within Physics yes, but I doubt he would have had guest shots on ST:TNG, The Simpsons, Futurama, and The Big Bang Theory (I just checked the IDMB database- they don't mention Futurama but they do say he's a Capricorn. I find that appalling that they mention a Scientists…
  • Feeling Underappreciated

    19 Mar 2015 | 6:58 am
    As academics we live and die by our research. While our proofs are either correct or not, the import of our work has a far more subjective feel. One can see where the work is published or how many citations it gets and we often say that we care most about the true intrinsic or extrinsic value of the research. But the measure of success of a research that we truly care most about is how it is viewed within the community. Such measures can have a real value in terms of hiring, tenure, promotion, raises and grants but it goes deeper, filling some internal need to have our research matter to our…
  • Has anything interesting ever come out of a claimed proof that P=NP or P ≠ NP?

    15 Mar 2015 | 7:25 pm
    When I was young and foolish and I heard that someone thinks they proven P=NP or P ≠  NP I would think Wow- maybe they did!. Then my adviser, who was on the FOCS committee, gave me a paper that claimed to resolve P vs NP!   to review for FOCS.  It was terrible. I got a became more skeptical. When I was older and perhaps a byte less foolish I would think the following: For P=NP proofs: I am sure it does not proof P=NP BUT maybe there are some nice ideas here that could be used to speed up some known algorithms in practice, or give some insights, or something. Could still…
  • Quotes with which I disagree

    12 Mar 2015 | 4:25 am
    Often we hear pithy quotes by famous people but some just don't hold water. "Computer science is no more about computers than astronomy is about telescopes." Usually attributed to Edsger Dijkstra, the quote tries to capture that using computers or even programming is not computer science, which I agree. But computer science is most definitely about the computers, making them connected, smarter, faster, safer, reliable and easier to use. You can get a PhD in computer science with a smarter cache system, you can't get a PhD in Astronomy from developing a better telescope lens. "If your…
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    IMA Journal of Applied Mathematics - current issue

  • Examination of SGP4 along-track errors for initially circular orbits

    Easthope, P. F.
    20 Mar 2015 | 8:46 am
    This paper examines the SGP4 orbit propagation equations for the specific case of an initially circular satellite orbit, with the aim of understanding the along-trajectory errors that are observed in practice. In particular, the SGP4 equations are compared with analytic expressions obtained by means of a regular perturbation expansion and two discrepancies have been found in the along-track angle u, both of order J2 (the primary earth oblateness term):A slightly different value for the linear trend, governing the secular behaviour, A missing sinusoidal term, with period equal to the orbit…
  • The existence and uniqueness of short-run equilibrium of the Dixit-Stiglitz-Krugman model in an urban-rural setting

    Tabata, M., Eshima, N., Kiyonari, Y., Takagi, I.
    20 Mar 2015 | 8:46 am
    The Dixit–Stiglitz–Krugman model is one of the most fundamental models in the new economic geography, and is described by the nominal wage equation. We obtain sufficient conditions for the existence and uniqueness of short-run equilibrium of this model, where a short-run equilibrium is defined by a solution of the nominal wage equation under the condition that the worker distribution is given. We construct an iteration scheme to obtain numerical short-run equilibria. No restriction is imposed on the total number of locations where economic activities are conducted.
  • Entropy generation for magnetohydrodynamic heat transfer over a non-isothermal stretching sheet with variable viscosity

    Salem, A. M.
    20 Mar 2015 | 8:46 am
    An analysis has been presented to analyse the entropy generation in an electrically conducting fluid under the influence of a constant transfer magnetic field over a linearly stretching non-isothermal flat sheet with suction and blowing at the sheet, in the presence of temperature-dependent viscosity. The governing equations for the problem were changed to dimensionless ordinary differential equations using a similarity transformation. The transformed governing equations in the present study were solved numerically using the Runge–Kutta method with the shooting technique. A comparison…
  • Mixed convection boundary-layer flow near the lower stagnation point of a horizontal circular cylinder with a second-order wall velocity condition and a constant surface heat flux

    Roşca, N. C., Roşca, A. V., Merkin, J. H., Pop, I.
    20 Mar 2015 | 8:46 am
    The mixed convection boundary-layer flow near the lower stagnation point of a horizontal circular cylinder with a second-order slip velocity model and a constant surface heat flux is investigated. By choosing appropriate similarity variables, the partial differential equations and boundary conditions governing the flow are transformed into a similarity system. This is solved numerically for different values of the governing parameters. These solutions can have two branches, an upper and a lower branch, over certain ranges of the mixed convection parameter. These numerical studies are…
  • A new mode reduction strategy for the generalized Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation

    Schmuck, M., Pradas, M., Pavliotis, G. A., Kalliadasis, S.
    20 Mar 2015 | 8:46 am
    Consider the generalized Kuramoto–Sivashinsky (gKS) equation. It is a model prototype for a wide variety of physical systems, from flame-front propagation, and more general front propagation in reaction–diffusion systems, to interface motion of viscous film flows. Our aim is to develop a systematic and rigorous low-dimensional representation of the gKS equation. For this purpose, we approximate it by a renormalization group equation which is qualitatively characterized by rigorous error bounds. This formulation allows for a new stochastic mode reduction guaranteeing optimality in…
 
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    eon

  • 3.14.15 and Einstein

    tpc
    26 Mar 2015 | 6:42 pm
    14 March 2015, was supposed to be the Pi day of the century — for obvious reasons. 14 March is also Einstein’s birthday, and 2015 interestingly marked 100 years of the theory of relativity. I liked this article written by Jeff Edelstein that described how Einstein tutored a 12 year old girl in maths. As Edelstein wrote, this could be a hoax, but personally for me, some stories (or myths) are worth retelling. There are two lovely quotes in the article, both recollections of the girl being tutored. He’d say we’re not going to bother with the homework problem. First he’d give…
  • Under Promise and Over Deliver

    tpc
    26 Mar 2015 | 6:20 pm
    Mr Lee Kuan Yew, the man responsible for making modern Singapore what it is today, passed away on 23 March 2015, aged 91. Incidentally it was also Emmy Noether’s birthday. I have wanted to start off my class by showing the google doodle but the lesson plan had to change in view of the more sombre and relevant news. The mathematical exploits and Emmy and Sophie will have to wait for another day. Throughout this whole week of national mourning, much have been wrote about his sagely advice. In particular, the current minister of defence said that Mr Lee often reminded the younger ministers…
  • Kobon Triangles

    tpc
    2 Feb 2015 | 7:44 pm
    Students occasionally have great ideas. Was discussing a problem that originated from some students but was not very well posed. We managed to reformulate it as the maximum number of triangles that can be formed with n lines. This turns out to be well known and already discussed by Gardner who stated that the problem came from Kobon Fujimura. A link to a MAA column by Ed Pegg Jr as well as the OEIS entry. The problem is incidentally still not completely solved.
  • Translate

    tpc
    22 Jan 2015 | 8:59 pm
    It’s slightly old but I only recently saw this article about how Google Translate make use of linear transformation. The new book on my desk eta products and theta series identities has the following quote in the preface. In der Theorie der Thetafunctionen ist es leicht, eine beliebig grosse Menge von Relationen aufzustellen, aber die Schwierigkeit beginnt da, wo es sich darum handelt, aus diesem Labyrinth von Formeln einen Ausweg zu finden. Die Besch¨aftigung mit jenen Formelmassen scheint auf die mathematische Phantasie eine verdorrende Wirkung auszu¨uben – G. Frobenius, 1893…
  • Nested radicals

    tpc
    7 Aug 2014 | 8:19 pm
    I was trying to solve an olympiad type problem involving a nested radical of the form [tex] \sqrt{a+b\sqrt{r}}.[/tex] I had managed to discover that [tex] \sqrt{a^2- b^2r} [/tex] is an integer but it turned out the trick is to rewrite [tex] \sqrt{a+b\sqrt{r}} = c + d\sqrt{r}.[/tex] Of course, one naturally asks if this is a specific incident or is there a general theory. This lead to digging up an article that I painstakingly photocopied from the library from back when photocopying was the norm. The article in question is by Susan Landau from 1994 in the Math. Intelligencer titled “How…
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    WordPress Tag: Mathematics

  • Erratum...

    hwbonner
    24 Mar 2015 | 12:50 am
    For me, studying math seems to gently bring back old memories… I remember smells and situations I never had thought about… Simple acts like picking up groceries at a store in London come to my mind. Or hearing a friend’s dad sing in church. Details from those times but somehow helping me to put myself back into my own skin… As if I’d been mis-remembering how that era really felt. Turns out I was wrong… Dead wrong in my last post. I said that, as long as a particular vector field was dependent only on the particular point you’re looking at, then the…
  • Scary Stuff; a Potential Nasty Surprise

    hypergeometric
    23 Mar 2015 | 9:32 pm
    If it were to come true, Wally Broecker would earn yet another, deserved scientific accolade: The Great Ocean Conveyor. More from WHOI here. “The climate system is an angry beast and we are poking it with sticks,” said Dr. Wallace S. Broecker of Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, who was one of the first to raise the alarm about abrupt climate change. ”We don’t know whether it’s going to pay attention to the pokes. But if it does, it might rise up and do something we don’t like.” (Courtesy of the New York Times.) Update. 2015-03-24, 20:44 EDT More on this…
  • Emmy Noether, mathematical genius

    Diane Vacca
    23 Mar 2015 | 8:24 pm
    Emmy Noether’s Google Doodle Emmy Noether was no less than “The most significant creative mathematical genius thus far produced since higher education of women began.” according to Einstein. The reason you’ve probably never heard of her is the profound sexism that was rampant in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Though she was prevented, as a woman, from enrolling in university classes, she obtained permission from her professors to audit. After graduation she taught at the Mathematical Institute of the same university (Erlangen) without pay for seven years.
  • Google Doodle on Emmy Noether

    neutralino08
    23 Mar 2015 | 7:01 pm
    Today’s Google Doodle (the stylized version of the google logo on the google homepage) honors Emmy Noether, the mathematician behind Noether’s Theorem. Noether’s theorem is incredibly important to modern physics because it explicitly works out the relationship between continuous symmetries of nature and conserved quantities. Thus, invariance with respect to time translation requires conservation of energy, spatial translation invariance leads to conservation of momentum, rotational invariance leads to conservation of angular momentum, U(1) symmetry leads to charge…
  • Previously On Apartment 3-G

    Joseph Nebus
    23 Mar 2015 | 5:30 pm
    First, I wanted to point folks who missed it over to my mathematics blog, since I did another comic strip review over there, and there aren’t really exactly word problems to do except the one that I solve for you. Second, A Labor Of Like tried very, very helpfully to fill in what’s happened in the backstory to Apartment 3-G, since I’ve given up all hope of understanding what’s happening in it, and I didn’t want that to get lost in the comments where nobody sees them. Here’s the attempt at filling in the backstory: Previously on Apartment 3-G: While on her…
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    Mr. L's Math

  • Pi Day Pics

    Bill Lombard
    10 Mar 2015 | 10:06 am
    Here’s a great set of pictures for math teachers and other pi fans, found at NETWORKWORLD.  This year Pi Day is special, because it happens on 3/14/15, and the decimal representation of pi is 3.1415 . . . Some folks are calling it Pi Day of the Century – we’ll see.
  • Spiral Crosses – a Rotation and Dilation Exercise

    Bill Lombard
    29 Dec 2014 | 12:14 pm
    This is a great exercise for Common Core Geometry instruction in the area of transformations. HINT: highlight a slider’s button, then use your cursor keys for fine adjustment; play around with the numbers to get pleasing shapes. Use slider n for number of iterations Use slider r for rotation in 0.001 increments Use slider d for dilation in 0.001 increments Build command structure in 3 steps: Enter Dilate[poly1, d^i], where i = 1, 2, 3 to find pattern Enter Rotate[Dilate[poly1, d^i], i r π], where i = 1, 2, 3 to find pattern Enter Sequence[Rotate[Dilate[poly1, d^i], i r π], i, 1, n, 1]…
  • Polygons and Diagonals

    Bill Lombard
    29 Dec 2014 | 11:15 am
    Number of diagonals in a polygon: If n = number of vertex points, then D = number of diagonals = n(n-3)/2. Slider n controls the number as well as the color. In the Advanced tab, Red = n / 36, Green = 1 – n / 36, and Blue = 0, so the color changes from Green to Red as the number of sides moves from 3 to 36. reference: I modified sonom’s idea from http://tube.geogebra.org/material/show/id/137056 The downloadable file can be found here. My other GeoGebraTube apps can be found here
  • Spirograph-Epitrochoid Earth and Moon

    Bill Lombard
    29 Dec 2014 | 10:47 am
    An epitrochoid is the path traced by a point on a circle (M) that travels on the outside of another circle (E). This can be used to model the path of the Moon (M) in orbit around the Earth (E). There are about 13.3 revolutions(n) of the Moon about the Earth in one year. -credit-Malin Christersson-http://www.geogebratube.org/material/show/id/87141 The downloadable file can be found here. My other GeoGebraTube apps can be found here
  • Polar Vector Clock

    Bill Lombard
    29 Dec 2014 | 10:17 am
    Polar definitions: Sec=90°-(6a)°, Min=90°-(a/10)°, Hour=90°-(a/120)° NOTE 1: when using polar coordinates a semicolon is needed NOTE 2: “Alt-o” (letter O, not number 0) gives degree symbol Vectors are used for clock hands. -from wikimedia commons: the clock face background, and set at Layer=0; other graphics are at Layer=1 -Animation speed = 0.00023148 to move second hand accurately -credit: Malin Christersson-http://www.malinc.se/math/geogebra/slideren.php The downloadable file can be found here. My other GeoGebraTube apps can be found here
 
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    Institute for Mathematics and Computer Science

  • Three Tips for Nurturing the Good Habit of Delayed Gratification

    IMACS Staff Writer
    12 Mar 2015 | 6:50 am
    The ability to delay gratification has been shown in various studies to be a strong predictor of academic success, even more so than IQ. Can parents help nurture this ability in children? Yes! But it takes more than a didactic approach. Many parents are probably familiar with the famous marshmallow experiment where young children were given a choice between one marshmallow now or two if they could wait 15 minutes. It’s helpful to recall that the original experiment focused not on whether the children could wait but rather on what strategies helped them to wait. Rochester University…
  • Not Your Father’s Algebra: A New Online Course for Talented Students

    IMACS Staff Writer
    11 Feb 2015 | 10:00 pm
    EMF teaches modern algebra, which has important applications in public-key cryptography. The Institute for Mathematics and Computer Science (IMACS) recently released its first online algebra course, Algebra: Groups, Rings and Fields. This is the tenth course in the Elements of Mathematics: Foundations (EMF) program for talented secondary school students. Our latest self-paced offering has generated a fair amount of inquiries from parents seeking options for their mathematically advanced child. The answers to some of those questions can be found in the FAQ at elementsofmathematics.com. IMACS…
  • Which Computer Programming Language Should My Child Learn?

    IMACS Staff Writer
    14 Jan 2015 | 10:00 pm
    The "learn to code" movement has emphasized teaching computer programming to children, and so many parents are asking, "Which language should my child learn?" It’s easy to be overwhelmed by the myriad choices: Java, Python, Ruby, C++, Objective-C, and so on. Ten years ago, the list of languages would have been different, but the question would still have been the same. So instead of focusing on learning a particular language that is popular at the moment and wondering if it’s the "right" choice, consider that your child would benefit most from…
  • Improving Math Education through History

    IMACS Staff Writer
    17 Dec 2014 | 10:00 pm
    A recent study published in the Philosophy of Mathematics Education Journal confirms that teachers’ images of mathematics and their mathematics history knowledge are interlinked. According to the study’s lead author, Danielle Goodwin of the Institute for Mathematics and Computer Science (IMACS), "By and large, the teachers with low history scores in this study were the teachers who exhibited narrow, negative views of mathematics." Key findings from the study include: Respondents with low history scores were more likely to indicate that they believed mathematics overall…
  • IMACS Student Shiva Oswal Named MOEMS Regional Mathlete of the Year

    IMACS Staff Writer
    19 Nov 2014 | 10:00 pm
    IMACS student Shiva Oswal is ready for his soccer match. This month’s IMACS Blog features Shiva Oswal, one of the top performers in our Elements of Mathematics: Foundations (EMF) self-paced, online program for talented secondary school students. Shiva has been enrolled in EMF since the beginning when IMACS introduced the first course of the series in late 2012. As his mom told us, “[O]ur son is an avid user of online educational resources. I recently asked him to pick his favorite online course. He answered, ‘most definitely EMF, by a wide margin’.” Please tell…
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    mathrecreation

  • are you experienced?

    Dan MacKinnon
    25 Mar 2015 | 7:52 pm
    Don't despairA search for "math" in the iTunes store is likely to disappoint (maybe "maths" or "mathematics" would provide better results). I haven't tried Math Drills Lite - it is likely the last thing I would want to download, yet it comes up first.A sad situationBut this is happy post, because there is a math app, well, more of an interactive book, that is engaging, interesting, well written, and attractively designed, that conveys mathematics as its practitioners and enthusiasts see it: beautiful and creative, not dry and confusing. Mathema, written by two…
  • a tile arrangement, or airport fun

    Dan MacKinnon
    19 Mar 2015 | 7:57 pm
    Is there anything nicer than a notebook with grid-lined pages? Maybe, but they are pretty nice - and I count myself very fortunate to have just obtained a new one. And thanks mostly to a longish wait in the Vancouver airport, this is what ended up on page one.The image on the tiles are the simplest non-trivial knot, the trefoil, which you could also put together using these other tiles.Along a given row or column (following the slight skew), the tiles are alternately rotated back and forth by 90 degrees - in the rows they alternate between being placed at 0 and 90 degrees or at 270 and…
  • season's greetings

    Dan MacKinnon
    11 Mar 2015 | 7:39 pm
  • bus number factoring

    Dan MacKinnon
    27 Jan 2015 | 7:09 pm
    Each bus in Ottawa has a four digit number that identifies it (like 4476 above). One thing to do while riding, if you don't have a bus transfer to play with, is to pass the time factoring that bus identifier (it's also printed on the inside of the bus, in case you miss it getting in).We all know some basic divisibility rules to help with factoring: If it ends in a zero, it's divisible by 10, if it's even then its divisible by 2, if it ends in a 5 then it's divisible by 5. You may know that if the last two digits of a number are divisible by 4 then the whole number is also divisible by 4…
  • Some notes on the Kaprekar function

    Dan MacKinnon
    2 Dec 2014 | 5:50 pm
    Consider a 3 digit number, say 395. Take its digits and form the greatest and least possible 3 digit numbers and subtract them: 935 - 359 = 594. Now do the same with the result:  954 - 459 = 495. Try it again, and you see that the process has hit a fixed point: 954 - 459 = 495.The Kaprekar function involves taking a number, computing two shuffles of its digits (the shuffle with the greatest value, and the one with the least value), and then taking the difference of those two shuffles. So for an integer n, if g is the number you get from re-arranging the digits of n from greatest to…
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    Math-Blog

  • Measuring Up, SAT Scores, and Coding Interviews

    John F. McGowan, Ph.D.
    16 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    Introduction Measuring Up: What Educational Testing Really Tells Us is a 2008 book by Professor Daniel Koretz of Harvard. Koretz, the Henry Lee Shattuck Professor of Education at Harvard, is a noted expert on educational assessment and testing policy. Professor Koretz is both an excellent writer and also public speaker as evidenced by many short videos at BigThink and YouTube. Measuring Up is an “accessible” book that tries and mostly succeeds in teaching the basic concepts, both statistical and testing specific, of educational achievement tests such as the SAT (the test formerly…
  • Review of Damned Lies and Statistics: Untangling Numbers from the Media, Politicians, and Activists

    John F. McGowan, Ph.D.
    9 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    DAMNED LIES AND STATISTICS: Untangling Numbers from the Media, Politicians, and Activists (UPDATED EDITION) Joel Best University of California Press Berkeley and Los Angeles, California 2001, 2012 Print Length: 213 pages My Rating: 4/5 Introduction Damned Lies and Statistics is an excellent book on the misuse of statistics by Joel Best, a Professor of Sociology and Criminal Justice at the University of Delaware. Lies was first published in 2001 and updated in 2012. There is also a sequel More Damned Lies and Statistics: How Numbers Confuse Public Issues. Lies gives many examples of bad…
  • Book Review: e: the Story of a Number

    John F. McGowan, Ph.D.
    16 Feb 2015 | 6:00 am
    e: The Story of a Number by Eli Maor Princeton Science Library Series Published by Princeton University Press, 41 William Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 Copyright © 1994 by Princeton University Press Page Count: 248 pages My Rating: 4/5 Introduction e: The Story of a Number is a book about e (2.718281828459045…), sometimes known as Euler’s Number or Euler’s Constant after the great mathematician Leonhard Euler. e: The Story of a Number is an “accessible” math book, rather than a “popular” math book, that tries to teach an advanced topic (really…
  • Book Review: A Mind for Numbers

    John F. McGowan, Ph.D.
    26 Jan 2015 | 6:00 am
    A Mind for Numbers How to Excel at Math and Science (Even if you Flunked Algebra) by Barbara Oakley, Ph.D. JEREMY P. TARCHER/ PENGUIN Published by the Penguin Group Penguin Group (USA) LLC New York, New York 10014 2014 My Rating: 3/5 Introduction A Mind for Numbers is a good but not great book on techniques for learning math and science. The book covers a large range of methods including alternating between “diffuse” and “focused” thinking, “chunking,” practicing recall to firmly imprint knowledge in long term memory, the “memory palace” method…
  • Review of Falling Behind? Boom, Bust, and the Global Race for Scientific Talent

    John F. McGowan, Ph.D.
    12 Jan 2015 | 6:00 am
    Falling Behind? Boom, Bust, and the Global Race for Scientific Talent by Michael S. Teitelbaum Princeton University Press March 30, 2014 Introduction Falling Behind? is a recent (March 2014) book by Michael Teitelbaum of the Sloan Foundation, a demographer and long time critic of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) shortage claims. Falling Behind? is an excellent book with a wealth of data and information on the history of booms and busts in science and engineering employment since World War II, STEM shortage claims in general, and lobbying for “high-skilled”…
 
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    MathFour

  • Seeing Math at Church

    Bon
    25 Mar 2015 | 3:04 am
    This is part of Wordless Wednesday…
  • Finding Math in the Strangest Places

    Bon
    11 Mar 2015 | 3:21 am
    I’ve written a lot. Including 160 posts on my crazy “cutting my teeth” blog, Idearella.com, two dozen guest posts, and 530 posts on MathFour.com. But my favorites pieces all involve how math can be seen in weird and unusual ways. Which prompted me to collect some of my fav’s. Which I thought I’d share, in case you’re as curious about it as I am. pickles toilet paper zombies Christmas trees lipstick potato chips crossing the street bedsheets and folding them tattoos drug dealing laundry hurting the ones you love social media marriage hearts and more…
  • Gathering and Organizing Your Math Folder

    Bon
    6 Mar 2015 | 2:39 am
    I attended the 4.0 Schools “Essentials” class last week in New Orleans for That’s Math. This quote struck me: “Creativity comes from constraint.” It made me itch to do another 50 word post. So I thought I’d combine a couple of my favorite Friday fun flurries – 50 Word Friday AND Five Minute Friday. This week’s prompt for #FMFParty is gather. Take a peek under the obnoxious image to see the short 50 words I have to say about it (that I wrote in under 5 minutes!)… Here goes… Did the Tasmanian Devil organize some of your students’ folders? Try these…
  • Getting the Most from Your Math Book {Free Downloadable Discussion Questions}

    Bon
    3 Mar 2015 | 2:36 am
    Most students use a math book to do their assignments. But rarely do students read a math book. But some people do use math books for other reasons. Like: To look at examples For reference To teach themselves Regardless of why you open a math book, knowing a bit about it can be helpful. Here’re some things to ask about your math book: What’s on the inside front and back covers? Sometimes there are formulas, charts or other handy things there. Also look for a quick reference card near the back that can be torn out. If there’s too much information for the front and back…
  • Prime Factorization Graphic Organizer

    Bon
    19 Feb 2015 | 3:56 am
    I have a thing for prime factorizations. Okay, you could say I’m obsessed. And it kills me when students mess it up because of bad handwriting. They think they’re bad at it when they just need a little help neatening things up. So I created this handy prime factorization graphic organizer (free to download, btw) to help out. Here’s a couple of examples of how to use it. You can have your students use highlighters around the primes (keeping them from obscuring the numbers) or you can have them just trace the boxes. And when your students get into multiplying fractions, they…
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    CSE Blog - quant, math, computer science puzzles

  • Dividing Pizza with a Clock

    Pratik Poddar
    5 Mar 2015 | 9:47 pm
    Source: Alok Goyal Puzzle Page ( http://alokgoyal1971.com/ ) . Alok is ex-IIT Delhi, Partner at Helion VC Problem: Part I (Easy): Using a clock, divide a pizza among 12 people Part II (Difficult): Using a clock, divide a pizza among 11 people?
  • Buying in Rocket Ships and Selling in Fire Sale

    Pratik Poddar
    18 Feb 2015 | 5:11 am
    Source: Asked to me by Ankush Jain (CSE IITB 2011, Morgan Stanley Quant Associate). He took it from Algorithms Design book by Tardos and Kleinberg Problem: Easy case: You’re trying to buy equipments whose costs are appreciating. Item i appreciates at a rate of r_i > 1 per month, starting from $100, so if you buy it t months from now you will pay 100*((r_i)^t). If you can only buy one item per month, what is the optimal order in which to buy them? Difficult case: You’re trying to sell equipments whose costs are depreciating. Item i depreciates at…
  • Box in Box problem

    Pratik Poddar
    23 Jan 2015 | 2:31 am
    Source: Sent to me by Sudeep Kamath Problem: Airline check-in baggage has size restriction by ​so-called ​linear dimension: length + breadth + height should not exceed 62 inches. Prove that you can't "cheat" by packing a box with higher linear dimension into a box with ​lower​ linear dimension.
  • Fibonacci Multiple Puzzle

    Pratik Poddar
    21 Jan 2015 | 2:30 am
    Source: Mailed to me by Kushagra Singhal, Ex-IIT Kanpur, PhD Student at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Problem: Prove that for any positive K and a natural number n, every (n*K)th number in the Fibonacci sequence is a multiple of the Kth number in the Fibonacci sequence. More formally, for any natural number n, let F(n) denote Fibonacci number n. That is, F(0) = 0, F(1) = 1, and F(n+2) = F(n+1) + F(n). Prove that for any positive K and natural n, F(n*K) is a multiple of F(K).
  • Gold Silver Numbers Puzzle

    Pratik Poddar
    19 Jan 2015 | 3:00 am
    Source: Mailed to me by JDGM ("regular commenter JDGM")Problem:The integers greater than zero are painted such that:• every number is either gold or silver.• both paints are used.• silver number + gold number = silver number• silver number * gold number = gold numberGiven only this information, for each of the following decide whether it is a gold number, a silver number, or could be either:1.) gold number * gold number2.) gold number + gold number3.) silver number * silver number4.) silver number + silver number
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    Motion Math

  • Yes! Cool! I did it! Look!

    Jacob
    26 Mar 2015 | 11:31 am
    We recently participated in the NYC Innovation Zone’s Short Cycle Challenge, piloting the Motion Math Educator in the 4th grade classrooms of teachers Helen Bruno-Raccuia, Jackie Hickman, and Cris Curatolo of P.S. 30 Westerleigh School in Staten Island. Here, Helen describes our collaboration: Thank you Helen, Jackie, Cris, and your students for all your great feedback!
  • Free Pilot Program for Educators

    Brendan Appold
    16 Dec 2014 | 7:04 am
    Exciting news: if you give us regular feedback, you can pilot the full Motion Math: Educator game suite and dashboard for free this school year! Sign up here. In September, our team released the Motion Math: Educator, which bundles all of our games into one iPad app and provides a dashboard for teachers to monitor student progress based on gameplay. We are excited to announce that we are now offering free pilots of the Educator at the classroom, school, and district level, in exchange for regular feedback from educators who join the pilot program. To date, we have over 3 million downloads of…
  • From Entreé to Spice: the Promise of Assessment

    Coram
    3 Nov 2014 | 9:16 pm
    (note: this post appeared on the Common Sense Media blog) The rapid ascent of digital technology in education presents a singular opportunity to transform assessment. With the capacity to capture student learning in a variety of ways, and in minute detail, educational technologies can engage students with authentic learning while simultaneously providing teachers with rich, formative data. In this way, assessments can evolve from a separate entreé at the end of the meal to a spice that seamlessly blends into and enhances the main course. Formative data can come from unlikely sources, such…
  • Games and Learning on the Motion Math: Educator

    Jacob
    2 Oct 2014 | 10:19 am
    Lee Banville from Gamesandlearning.org interviewed us about the Motion Math: Educator launch with good questions about our reasons for focusing on teachers.
  • Introducing the Motion Math Educator!

    Jacob
    1 Oct 2014 | 3:27 pm
    Big news: we’ve just launched the Motion Math Educator, our classroom solution. What is the Educator? First, it’s access to all our delightful iPad elementary games: Fractions, Zoom, Hungry Fish, Wings, Questimate, Match, and Pizza, plus two new games we’ll add this school year. Second, the Educator is the answer to many questions we’ve heard from teachers: “Can I see how my students are doing in your games?” “How does mastery in your games connect to mastery of Common Core standards?” “Can I load in my student roster?” Here’s…
 
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    Marauders of the Lost Sciences

  • Nash on the Bargaining Problem

    Editors
    14 Mar 2015 | 3:15 pm
    What follows is John Nash’s treatment of a simple two-person game as to way to model bargaining. UTILITY THEORY OF THE INDIVIDUAL The concept of an “anticipation” is important in this theory. This concept will be explained partly by illustration. … Continue reading →
  • Weyl on the Gibbs Phenomenon in Fourier Analysis

    Editors
    11 Mar 2015 | 1:36 pm
    Weyl describes the early influence the Gibbs Pheonomeon had on his research. Notice how A. A. Michelson, who was an experimental physicist, criticized in Nature mathematicians notions of the convergence of a sequence of functions. Since this is a lecture … Continue reading →
  • Hadamard on iteration

    Editors
    2 Mar 2015 | 7:56 pm
    Many of heard of Hadamard only through his book “Psychology of Invention in the Mathematical Field”, but he was a first rate and prolific mathematician as well as a commentator on how mathematicians work. As is well known, the problem … Continue reading →
  • Skilling and Gull use Maximum Entropy to reconstruct images

    Editors
    26 Feb 2015 | 12:27 pm
    Image reconstruction seems like magic because at first it’s not clear there’s enough information in the blurred image to reliable infer a less blurred image. It’s not surprising Bayesian statistics is a useful tool for doing this, but entropy which … Continue reading →
  • A Bayesian correctly predicts experimental frequencies from pure thought

    Editors
    20 Feb 2015 | 9:00 am
    The Bertrand problem (first posed in 1889) can be formulated as A long straw is tossed at random onto a circle given that it falls so that it intersects the circle, what is the probability that the chord thus defined … Continue reading →
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