Math

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  • Yes! Cool! I did it! Look!

    Motion Math
    Jacob
    26 Mar 2015 | 11:31 am
    We recently participated in the NYC Innovation Zone’s Short Cycle Challenge, piloting the Motion Math Educator in the 4th grade classrooms of teachers Helen Bruno-Raccuia, Jackie Hickman, and Cris Curatolo of P.S. 30 Westerleigh School in Staten Island. Here, Helen describes our collaboration: Thank you Helen, Jackie, Cris, and your students for all your great feedback!
  • Book Review: Birth of a Theorem

    Scientific American - Math
    24 Apr 2015 | 12:00 pm
    Books and recommendations from Scientific American -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
  • Calculating how the Pacific was settled: Sailing against prevailing winds, spotting big islands

    Mathematics News -- ScienceDaily
    22 Apr 2015 | 5:40 am
    Using statistics that describe how an infectious disease spreads, an anthropologist analyzed different theories of how people first settled islands of the vast Pacific between 3,500 and 900 years ago. Adrian Bell found the two most likely strategies were to travel mostly against prevailing winds and seek easily seen islands, not necessarily the nearest islands.
  • Algebra: it matters

    ChapterZero
    swiftset
    15 Sep 2014 | 4:42 pm
    I’m looking at two different models for learning polynomial functions, and trying to determine if they are equivalent. After a couple days of thinking, I’ve reduced the question to the following: Can every symmetric polynomial of degree \(r\) in \(d\) variables that has no constant term be written as a sum of the \(r\)-th powers of linear polynomials in \(d\) degrees and a homogeneous polynomial of degree \(r\) each of whose monomials involves at most \(d-1\) variables?
  • Motion Math: Cupcake! Edu and our Classroom Cupcake Contest

    Motion Math
    Jacob
    21 Apr 2015 | 10:57 am
    Today we’ve released the classroom version of our new game: Motion Math: Cupcake! Edu. Students create their own cupcake delivery business, learning about the coordinate system, unit rates, pricing, and diverse word problems. (More details on the game and relevant standards here.) Plus, Cupcake! Edu connects to your Motion Math teacher dashboard so you can use it as a formative assessment tool. To play Cupcake for free in your classroom: Sign up for a free Motion Math Educator trial account. Download the free Motion Math: Cupcake! Edu app onto your classroom iPads. We’re also…
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    MATH - Google News

  • Colorado House, Senate divided over ninth-grade math, reading tests - Colorado Springs Gazette

    25 Apr 2015 | 12:13 pm
    Colorado House, Senate divided over ninth-grade math, reading testsColorado Springs GazetteDENVER - The assessment debate is likely to come down to the much-debated ninth-grade math and reading tests. The House passed its version of the state's testing reduction effort Friday on second reading with broad bipartisan support, and it included ...
  • Lesbian teacher: How I teach LGBT in math class to 'hide' it from parents Read ... - Lifesite

    25 Apr 2015 | 10:55 am
    LifesiteLesbian teacher: How I teach LGBT in math class to 'hide' it from parents Read Lifesite“Social justice math happens when students are solving problems using real, engaging, and meaningful numbers. Social justice issues happening in their school, community, or even globally become the context for the math that the students are doing,” she ...and more »
  • Blairsville Elementary School students participate in Math-A-Thon - Indiana Gazette

    25 Apr 2015 | 7:55 am
    Indiana GazetteBlairsville Elementary School students participate in Math-A-ThonIndiana GazetteBecause the majority of St. Jude funding comes from individual contributors and programs like the Math-A-Thon, families never receive a bill from St. Jude for treatment, travel, housing or food, so families can focus on what matters most — helping
  • With more students in the equation, math department faculty numbers don't add up - GW Hatchet (subscription)

    24 Apr 2015 | 6:38 pm
    GW Hatchet (subscription)With more students in the equation, math department faculty numbers don't add upGW Hatchet (subscription)Mathematics department chair Murli Gupta said the demand of the growing number of math majors coupled with University budget cuts has stretched the department thin. The number of math majors has tripled over the past five years while the number of ...
  • NYS opt out stats by district for math (search): At least 80000 refuse test - Syracuse.com

    24 Apr 2015 | 8:25 am
    Syracuse.comNYS opt out stats by district for math (search): At least 80000 refuse testSyracuse.comDistricts have been slower to report the number of students opting out of the math test for some reason, Gross said. However, she said nearly all the districts reporting show increases in the number of students opting out in math compared to the ELA exam.#lohudreacts: State tests leave questions in wakeThe Journal News | LoHud.comCounty-Wide, about 2600 Students Opt-Out of Common Core Tests FeaturedSaratoga TODAY Newspaperall 26 news articles »
 
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    Mathematics News -- ScienceDaily

  • Calculating how the Pacific was settled: Sailing against prevailing winds, spotting big islands

    22 Apr 2015 | 5:40 am
    Using statistics that describe how an infectious disease spreads, an anthropologist analyzed different theories of how people first settled islands of the vast Pacific between 3,500 and 900 years ago. Adrian Bell found the two most likely strategies were to travel mostly against prevailing winds and seek easily seen islands, not necessarily the nearest islands.
  • New model to predict pharmacodynamic activity may improve drug discovery

    20 Apr 2015 | 8:13 am
    A new mathematical model that uses drug-target kinetics to predict how drugs work in vivo may provide a foundation to improve drug discovery, which is frequently hampered by the inability to predict effective doses of drugs, researchers report
  • Should a political party form a coalition? Voters and math decide

    15 Apr 2015 | 10:33 am
    A new paper proposes mathematical models to analyze political decision-making. "Mathematics is important in many aspects of social behavior. Politics is just one of these aspects, since some of the typical behavior in politics can be characterized by suitable quantities which, usually, evolve in time," says an author. "In other words, political parties are examples of dynamical systems."
  • New mathematical method enhances hydrology simulations

    15 Apr 2015 | 7:29 am
    A team applied sophisticated mathematical solutions to fine tune water and energy exchange parameters, numerical stand-ins for complex processes, to more accurately simulate water and energy fluxes in an important model under different conditions.
  • Researcher creates software that locates real-time leaks in water, oil or gas pipes

    10 Apr 2015 | 8:34 am
    Through the laws of physics and application of a mathematical model of fluid mechanics, a new software calculates when an irregularity occurs on site of a gas, oil or water pipe. The software is called VIVIUNAM and performs logical deductions in real time, allowing to identify the type of failure and get to the root of the problem, thus avoiding a waste of time, by digging or manually searching for the problem throughout the pipeline, said the researcher.
 
 
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    Loren on the Art of MATLAB

  • The Netflix Prize and Production Machine Learning Systems: An Insider Look

    Loren Shure
    22 Apr 2015 | 6:10 am
    Do you watch movies on Netflix? Binge-watch TV series? Do you use their movie recommendations? Today's guest blogger, Toshi Takeuchi, shares an interesting blog post he saw about how Netflix uses machine learning for movie recommendations.ContentsHow Recommender Systems WorkWhat Netflix did with the winning solutionsSo, Was It Worth $1M?Lessons Learned: New MetricsLessons Learned: System ArchitectureMATLAB on Hadoop and MATLAB Production ServerClosingBack in 2006 Netflix announced a famed machine learning and data mining competition "Netflix Prize" with a $1 million award, finally claimed in…
  • Can You Find Love through Text Analytics?

    Loren Shure
    8 Apr 2015 | 7:03 am
    Jimmy Fallon Blew a Chance to Date Nicole Kidman, but do you know there is supposedly a way to fall in love with anyone? Today's guest blogger, Toshi Takeuchi, would like to talk about finding love with MATLAB.ContentsLove ExperimentLatent Semantic Analysis with MATLABText Processing PipelineTF-IDF WeightingLow-Rank ApproximationVisualize Online Dating ProfilesComputing SimilarityGetting the Ranked MatchesWhat about Japanese Text?Call for ActionLove ExperimentI read a very intriguing New York Times article To Fall in Love With Anyone, Do This. It was about an experiment that went like…
  • The Winter of Our Vectorization

    Loren Shure
    1 Apr 2015 | 6:19 am
    ContentsGoing the Whole 9 FeetEnter MATLABTime for Some Logical IndexingConvoluted, Yet SimplerFun with arrayfunPutting it All TogetherSpring into Action!Today I'd like to introduce guest blogger Matt Tearle who works on our MATLAB Product Training materials here at MathWorks. Matt is on a mission to teach the world MATLAB, but this winter is testing his resolve. Annoyed that 22" of snow forced him to reschedule a training, today he shows just how bad this winter had been.Going the Whole 9 FeetIt has been a brutal winter at MathWorks' headquarters in Natick, MA (a little west of Boston). I…
  • Bayesian Brain Teaser

    Loren Shure
    25 Mar 2015 | 11:41 am
    Winter in Boston can get quite cold. When we get a lot of snow, we need to take a break after shoveling, and solving puzzles is nice way to spend time indoors. Today's guest blogger, Toshi Takeuchi, gives you an interesting brain teaser, written during one of the many 2015 snowstorms in Boston.ContentsNate Silver and Bayesian ReasoningThe Monty Hall Problem - SimulationWhy Switching Is Better - Bayesian AnalysisNate Silver's MethodBayesian in Machine LearningIt's Your TurnNate Silver and Bayesian ReasoningIn The Signal and the Noise, the famed data scientist Nate Silver discusses the…
  • The Ultimate Pi Day is Over… Now What?

    Loren Shure
    16 Mar 2015 | 11:28 am
    Today's post is from guest blogger Dan Seal who works in the MATLAB Product Marketing team here at MathWorks. Dan recently celebrated Pi Day on 3/14/15 and wanted to know what other holidays he might be able to celebrate in the future.ContentsStarting smallDefining the possible date formatsExtracting the digitsBuilding the list of special datesPrinting out the resultsGeneralizing to a larger set of inputsNow it's your turnEvery year, mathematicians and their geeky cohort celebrate Pi Day on the fourteenth of March, a date whose written representation (3/14) looks like the first three digits…
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    Homeschool Math Blog

  • Math Stars - for summer math and more

    24 Apr 2015 | 2:00 pm
    I have used Math Stars problem solving sets with my girls for several years, and they have always greatly enjoyed them. Math Stars include various puzzles and challenging math problems. They  come as PDF files (free and ready to download & use) in sets for grades 1-8. They're great to use for summer math  or for some fun problem solving at any time.I tend to use the problems from one grade level below the grade the student is in. One reason I like these so much is the variety of the problems - geometrical puzzles, number puzzles, logical thinking, etc. --  all of it is…
  • Lessons on statistics

    14 Apr 2015 | 9:13 am
    Is statistics one of your favorite or least favorite topics in math? :)Well... however you feel about it, in middle school students need to learn some beginnings of statistics, such as how to draw a boxplot, a histogram, or a stem-and-leaf plot, learn about statistical distributions, measures of central tendency (mean, median, and mode), measures of variability, and so on.You can now do so with these videos of mine  :^)  or with this Youtube playlist.I hope they are of help!
  • An update on grade MM 7-B

    1 Apr 2015 | 11:30 am
    Some have asked about grade 7-B (once again...)I'm currently writing lessons for the last chapter (statistics & probability) AND writing the answer key for the second to last chapter (on the Pythagorean Theorem). And two people are proofreading the geometry chapter (in different sections). So it's coming along just fine. ;^) I'm hoping to have it ready in late May or early June.Here's an example of what I was working on just this morning - a problem for a lesson where students compare two sets of data. I made up the data, but it is based on real data from the official government site for…
  • April math calendar

    1 Apr 2015 | 10:22 am
    I just printed this math calendar out for my girls and they liked it! Something a bit intriguing and fun to look at as the month progresses -- and it can help them to learn a bit of math at the same time. :)
  • Math Mammoth Percent book updated

    28 Mar 2015 | 12:36 pm
    Math Mammoth Percent is a worktext (with both instruction & exercises) that teaches students the concept of percent, how to calculate the percentage of a number, to figure discounts, sales tax, and interest, to draw circle graphs, to differentiate between a percent of change and a percent of comparison, and to know how to calculate both.The text is suitable for grades 6 through 8 (middle school).This book has been now updated to include many new lessons that will ALSO be in the upcoming Math Mammoth grade 7-B. This means that you can use it to continue pre-algebra studies after 7-A.See…
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    Let's Play Math!

  • They’re Here! Math You Can Play Weekend Sale

    Denise Gaskins
    24 Apr 2015 | 9:21 am
    Finally, the first two books of my math games series are finished and loaded up on Amazon.com (and the other Amazons worldwide). To celebrate, I’m offering an introductory sale price this weekend: US$2.99 per book, now through Monday. Math Your Kids WANT To Do Are you tired of flashcards and repetitive worksheets? Now your children can practice their math skills by playing games. Math games pump up mental muscle, reduce the fear of failure, and develop a positive attitude toward mathematics. Through playful interaction, games strengthen a child’s intuitive understanding of numbers and…
  • Math Game: Thirty-One

    Denise Gaskins
    21 Apr 2015 | 10:06 am
    Math Concepts: addition to thirty-one, thinking ahead. Players: best for two. Equipment: one deck of math cards. How to Play Lay out the ace to six of each suit in a row, face up and not overlapping, one suit above another. You will have one column of four aces, a column of four twos, and so on‌—‌six columns in all. The first player flips a card upside down and says its number value. Players alternate, each time turning down one card, mentally adding its value to the running total, and saying the new sum out loud. The player who exactly reaches thirty-one, or who forces the…
  • Do You Blog About Math?

    Denise Gaskins
    14 Apr 2015 | 7:55 am
    [Image by Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com (CC BY 2.0) via Flickr.] It’s carnival time again. Activities, games, lessons, hands-on fun — if you’ve written a blog post about math, we’d love to have you join our Math Teachers at Play (MTaP) math education blog carnival. Posts must be relevant to students or teachers of school-level mathematics (that is, anything from preschool up through first-year calculus). Old posts are welcome, as long as they haven’t been published in past editions of this carnival. Click here to submit your blog post. Browse all the past editions…
  • Math Game: Chopsticks

    Denise Gaskins
    13 Apr 2015 | 5:06 am
    Feature photo above by Harry (Phineas H) via Flicker (CC BY 2.0). Math Concepts: counting up to five, thinking ahead. Players: two or more. Equipment: none. How to Play Each player starts with both hands as fists, palm down, pointer fingers extended to show one point for each hand. On your turn, use one of your fingers to tap one hand: If you tap an opponent’s hand, that person must extend as many extra fingers on that hand (in addition to the points already there) as you have showing on the hand that tapped. Your own fingers don’t change. If you force your opponent to extend all the…
  • Playful Math Snacks for April 2015

    Denise Gaskins
    7 Apr 2015 | 10:47 am
    Feature photo above by Nicolas Raymond (CC BY 3.0). The April “Let’s Play Math” newsletter went out Monday morning to everyone who signed up for Tabletop Academy Press math updates. If you’re not on the mailing list, you can still join in the fun: April 2015 archive page. Sign up for future newsletters. And remember: Newsletter subscribers are always the first to hear about new books, revisions, and sales or other promotions. A Preview Math Snack: Math Treks Playful, no-preparation math activities for all ages Created by Maria Droujkova, a Math Trek is a “virtual…
 
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    ChapterZero

  • Wilkinson on a priori error analysis

    swiftset
    21 Apr 2015 | 4:47 pm
    I’ve been reading a lot of NLA lately (e.g., a recent paper on communication-avoiding RRQR), and necessarily brushing up on some details I paid scant attention to in my NLA courses, like the details of the different types of pivoting. Which led me to this quote by a famous numerical analyst: There is still a tendency to attach too much importance to the precise error bounds obtained by an a priori error analysis. In my opinion, the bound itself is the least important part of it. The main object of such an analysis is to expose the potential instabilities, if any, of an algorithm so that…
  • Nystrom vs Random Feature Maps

    swiftset
    26 Dec 2014 | 10:37 pm
    I haven’t seen a truly convincing study comparing Nystrom approximations to Random Feature Map approximations. On the one hand, a NIPS 2012 paper compared the two and argued that because the bases Nystrom approximations use are adaptive to the problem, whereas those used by RFMs are not, Nystrom approximations are more efficient. This is an indisputable point, but the experiments done in the paper are not convincing: they used the same number of samples in Nystrom approximations as random features in RFMS. Instead, the fair comparison is to allot both methods the same number of FLOPs;…
  • My podcast masterlist

    swiftset
    6 Dec 2014 | 7:05 pm
    Here’s an early Christmas gift to you: a list of podcasts I enjoy! For listening while you’re doing all your holiday season travelling. APM: Marketplace KCRW’s Left, Right, and Center Newshour BBC World Update: Daily Commute Common Sense with Dan Carlin PRI’s The World: Latest Edition On the Media The Young Turks Video Podcast Citizen Radio Best of the Left Podcast The David Pakman Show TWIB! Prime (This Week in Blackness) MSNBC Rachel Maddow (video) NPR: Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates Podcast The Read The Complete Guide to Everything Throwing Shade My Brother, My…
  • Mirror descent is, in a precise sense, a second order algorithm

    swiftset
    1 Oct 2014 | 10:47 pm
    For one of our projects at eBay, I’ve been attempting to do a Poisson MLE fit on a large enough dataset that Fisher scoring is not feasible. The problem is that the data also has such large variance in the scales of the observation that stochastic gradient descent does not work, period — because of the exponentiation involved, you need to take a very tiny step size to avoid overflow errors, but this step size is shared by all the parameters, so you can’t make progress in this way. An alternative is adagrad, which maintains separate stepsizes for each parameter, but that…
  • Algebra: it matters

    swiftset
    15 Sep 2014 | 4:42 pm
    I’m looking at two different models for learning polynomial functions, and trying to determine if they are equivalent. After a couple days of thinking, I’ve reduced the question to the following: Can every symmetric polynomial of degree \(r\) in \(d\) variables that has no constant term be written as a sum of the \(r\)-th powers of linear polynomials in \(d\) degrees and a homogeneous polynomial of degree \(r\) each of whose monomials involves at most \(d-1\) variables?
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    Computational Complexity

  • Fifty Years of Moore's Law

    24 Apr 2015 | 4:20 am
    Gordon Moore formulated his famous law in a paper dated fifty years and five days ago. We all have seen how Moore's law has changed real-world computing, but how does it relate to computational complexity? In complexity we typically focus on running times but we really care about how large a problem we can solve in current technology. In one of my early posts I showed how this view can change how we judge running time improvements from faster algorithms. Improved technology also allows us to solve bigger problems. This is one justification for asymptotic analysis. For…
  • The New Oracle Result! The new circuit result! which do you care about?

    22 Apr 2015 | 6:47 am
    You have likely heard of the new result by Ben Roco, and Li-Yang on random oracles (see here for preprint) from either Lance or Scott or some other source: Lance's headline was PH infinite under random oracle Scott's headline was Two papers but when he stated the result he also stated it as a random oracle result. The paper itself has the title An average case depth hierarchy theorem for Boolean circuits and the abstract is: We prove an average-case depth hierarchy theorem for Boolean circuits over the standard basis of AND, OR, and NOT gates. Our hierarchy theorem says that for every d2,…
  • PH Infinite Under a Random Oracle

    16 Apr 2015 | 6:14 am
    Benjamin Rossman, Rocco Servedio and Li-Yang Tan show new circuit lower bounds that imply, among other things, that the polynomial-time hierarchy is infinite relative to a random oracle. What does that mean, and why is it important? The polynomial-time hierarchy can be defined inductively as follows: ΣP0 = P, the set of problems solvable in polynomial-time. ΣPi+1 = NPΣPi, the set of problems computable in nondeterministic polynomial-time that can ask arbitrary questions to the previous level. We say the polynomial-time hierarchy is infinite if ΣPi+1 ≠ ΣPi for all i…
  • Baseball is More Than Data

    14 Apr 2015 | 10:01 am
    As baseball starts its second week, lets reflect a bit on how data analytics has changed the game. Not just the Moneyball phenomenon of ranking players but also the extensive use of defensive shifts (repositioning the infielders and outfielders for each batter) and other maneuvers. We're not quite to the point that technology can replace managers and umpires but give it another decade or two. We've seen a huge increase in data analysis in sports. ESPN ranked teams based on their use of analytics and it correlates well with how those teams are faring. Eventually everyone will use the same…
  • FCRC 2015

    9 Apr 2015 | 4:12 am
    Every four years the Association for Computing Machinery organizes a Federated Computing Research Conference consisting of several co-located conferences and some joint events. This year's event will be held June 13-20 in Portland, Oregon and includes Michael Stonebraker's Turing award lecture. There is a single registration site for all conferences (early deadline May 18th) and I recommend booking hotels early and definitely before the May 16th cutoff. Theoretical computer science is well represented. 47th ACM Symposium on the Theory of Computing. Apply for student travel support by May…
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    Mathematics and Computation

  • Another PhD position in Ljubljana

    Andrej Bauer
    3 Apr 2015 | 4:12 am
    It is my pleasure to announce a second PhD position in Ljubljana! A position is available for a PhD student at the University of Ljubljana in the general research area of modelling and reasoning about computational effects. The precise topic is somewhat flexible, and will be decided in discussion with the student. The PhD will be supervised by Alex Simpson who is Professor of Computer Science at the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics. The position will be funded by the Effmath project (see project description). Full tuition & stipend will be provided. The candidate should have a…
  • A HoTT PhD position in Ljubljana

    Andrej Bauer
    22 Nov 2014 | 4:16 am
    I am looking for a PhD student in mathematics. Full tuition & stipend will be provided for a period of three years, which is also the official length of the programme. The topic of research is somewhat flexible and varies from constructive models of homotopy type theory to development of a programming language for a proof assistant based on dependent type theory, see the short summary of the Effmath project for a more detailed description. The candidate should have as many of the following desiderata as possible, and at the very least a master’s degree (or an equivalent one): a…
  • TEDx “Zeroes”

    Andrej Bauer
    16 Oct 2014 | 12:01 am
    I spoke at TEDx University of Ljubljana. The topic was how programming influences various aspects of life. I showed the audence how a bit of simple programming can reveal the beauty of mathematics. Taking John Baez’s The Bauty of Roots as an inspiration, I drew a very large image (20000 by 17500 pixels) of all roots of all polynomials of degree at most 26 whose coefficients are $-1$ or $1$. That’s 268.435.452 polynomials and 6.979.321.752 roots. It is two degrees more than Sam Derbyshire’s image,  so consider the race to be on! Who can give me 30 degrees? The code…
  • Reductions in computability theory from a constructive point of view

    Andrej Bauer
    19 Jul 2014 | 5:50 am
    Here are the slides from my Logic Coloquium 2014 talk in Vienna. This is joint work with Kazuto Yoshimura from Japan Advanced Institute for Science and Technology. Abstract: In constructive mathematics we often consider implications between non-constructive reasoning principles. For instance, it is well known that the Limited principle of omniscience implies that equality of real numbers is decidable. Most such reductions proceed by reducing an instance of the consequent to an instance of the antecedent. We may therefore define a notion of instance reducibility, which turns out to have a…
  • Seemingly impossible constructive proofs

    Martin Escardo
    8 May 2014 | 7:15 am
    In the post Seemingly impossible functional programs, I wrote increasingly efficient Haskell programs to realize the mathematical statement $\forall p : X \to 2. (\exists x:X.p(x)=0) \vee (\forall x:X.p(x)=1)$ for $X=2^\mathbb{N}$, the Cantor set of infinite binary sequences, where $2$ is the set of binary digits. Then in the post A Haskell monad for infinite search in finite time I looked at ways of systematically constructing such sets $X$ with corresponding Haskell realizers of the above omniscience principle. In this post I give examples of infinite sets $X$ and corresponding constructive…
 
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    Natural Blogarithms

  • My First Program from 1987

    SplineGuy
    20 Apr 2015 | 5:37 pm
    Back in 2010, I posted a brief story about one of the highlights of my childhood, the first time I was able to get a program to successfully compile and run on my Apple IIe clone, the Laser 128. Here’s the tale again: I was subscribed to a children’s magazine called “3-2-1 Contact” and in the back of every issue were a couple of programs in BASIC (as in the BASIC programming language). I can still vividly remember one of the most exciting and exhilarating moments of my childhood, perhaps of my whole life. The moment came after seemingly endless hours of trying to get the…
  • Cheryl’s Birthday – Singapore Math Problem

    SplineGuy
    14 Apr 2015 | 3:05 pm
    This math problem went viral yesterday so I had my kids tackle it. It took us all working together but we got a solution. Here’s the problem that appeared all over reddit, Facebook, and Twitter:    Don’t read any further unless you want to know the answer. #spoilers … Hint 1: Albert’s first statement rules out any month with a unique day (18 or 19) since he’s certain Bernard doesn’t know the exact date. If Bernard had been told 18, for example, that means he could know it was June 18, but Albert is certain Bernard doesn’t know so it…
  • Dean’s Corner – First Edition

    SplineGuy
    29 Mar 2015 | 4:11 pm
    I’m a little late in getting around to updating my blog (Natural Blogarithms) on my recent change in position at Wayland.  As of February 23, 2015, I am now the Dean of the School of Mathematics and Sciences.  (See Press Release) Below is my first contribution to the “quarterly” newsletter.  I hope you’ll check it out and peruse the rest of the newsletter so you see what’s up in our school Dean’s Corner “I’m coming home…to the place where I belong!” I actually remember it vividly, the spring of 1994, when I first walked onto the Wayland campus…
  • The Mathematics of Love

    SplineGuy
    13 Feb 2015 | 2:59 pm
    With Valentine’s Day around the corner, the whole of humanity is looking for answers on how to be truly happy in love, right?  And, certainly everyone is thinking of using the most powerful tool ever devised for answering life’s most difficult questions: Mathematics, of course Thanks to Hannah Fry’s TED talk posted today, we learn that Mathematics actually has a lot to say about optimizing your chances of finding love.  I’ve always been a big fan of hers, following her on Twitter (@FryRsquared), but this was an especially interesting talk. In honor of…
  • Get “Things” for Free (An Excellent To-Do list app)

    SplineGuy
    21 Nov 2014 | 7:42 am
    Before I moved all my action items to Trello, the “Things” app was my favorite To-Do list for getting things done (‪#‎GTD‬). It’s free this week if you want to try it out. I think they have separate apps for iPhone and iPad, so if you have both you might go ahead and get it now to try out later. Remember, if you get a free app, it’s yours for good, even if they raise the price again later. So you could get it this week, then delete, but re-install it anytime in the future for free. Give thanks to Apple for offering Things as its free App of the Week on the App…
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    The Math Less Traveled

  • The blog lives! and Secrets of Creation Trilogy

    Brent
    23 Apr 2015 | 8:42 am
    I haven’t written here in a really long time! But the blog has not been abandoned, just on hiatus. I have recently started blogging again so you can expect more posts in the near future! In the meanwhile, here’s what I’ve been up to: I successfully defended my PhD dissertation in October, and officially graduated in December. This year I’ve been having a lot of fun teaching in a 1-year visiting position at my alma mater, Williams College. I accepted a tenure-track position in the Department of Mathematics & Computer Science at Hendrix College in Conway, Arkansas,…
  • Permutation flower

    Brent
    23 May 2014 | 10:27 am
  • Factorization diagram posters!

    Brent
    13 Dec 2013 | 7:57 am
    I’ve finally gotten around to making a nice factorization diagram poster: You can buy high-quality prints from Imagekind. (If you order soon you should have them before Christmas! =) I’m really quite happy with imagekind, the print quality is fantastic and the prices seem reasonable. You can choose among different sizes—I suggest 32"x20" ($26 on the default matte paper, + shipping), but the next smaller size (24"x15", $17) is probably OK too. If you have ideas for variant posters you’d like to see, let me know (though I probably won’t be able to do anything until…
  • PIE day

    Brent
    15 Oct 2013 | 10:31 am
    [This is part six in an ongoing series; previous posts can be found here: Differences of powers of consecutive integers, Differences of powers of consecutive integers, part II, Combinatorial proofs, Making our equation count, How to explain the principle of inclusion-exclusion?. However, this post is self-contained; no need to go back and read the previous ones just yet.] “But”, I hear you protest, “Pi Day was ages ago!” Ah, but I didn’t say Pi Day, I said PIE Day. To clarify: Pi Day: a day on which to celebrate the not-so-fundamental circle constant, (March 14) Pie Day: a day on…
  • FARM 2013: call for demonstration proposals

    Brent
    8 Jul 2013 | 9:57 am
    Do you enjoy writing beautiful code to produce beautiful artifacts? Have something cool to show off at the intersection of functional programming and visual art, music, sound, modeling, visualization, or design? The deadline for submitting a paper has passed, but the Workshop on Functional Art, Music, Modeling and Design (FARM 2013) is currently seeking proposals for 10-20 minute demonstrations to be given during the workshop. For example, a demonstration could consist of a short tutorial, an exhibition of some work, or even a livecoding performance. Slots for demonstrations will be shorter…
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    eon

  • An identity

    tpc
    28 Mar 2015 | 8:54 pm
    The following problem is apparently a bonus question for 13 year olds at a local girls school: Evaluate the sum [tex] \displaystyle \frac{1-\frac{1}{2}+\frac{1}{3}-\frac{1}{4} + \cdots + \frac{1}{99} – \frac{1}{100}}{\frac{1}{1+101}+ \frac{1}{2+102} + \cdots + \frac{1}{50+150}}. [/tex] It’s not that easy if you ask me. I had to work out the following identity first before I managed to solve it. [tex]\displaystyle \sum_{k=1}^N \frac{1}{2k-1} – \frac{1}{2k} = \sum_{k=1}^N \frac{1}{k+N}. [/tex] The identity can be proved via induction.
  • 3.14.15 and Einstein

    tpc
    26 Mar 2015 | 6:42 pm
    14 March 2015, was supposed to be the Pi day of the century — for obvious reasons. 14 March is also Einstein’s birthday, and 2015 interestingly marked 100 years of the theory of relativity. I liked this article written by Jeff Edelstein that described how Einstein tutored a 12 year old girl in maths. As Edelstein wrote, this could be a hoax, but personally for me, some stories (or myths) are worth retelling. There are two lovely quotes in the article, both recollections of the girl being tutored. He’d say we’re not going to bother with the homework problem. First he’d give…
  • Under Promise and Over Deliver

    tpc
    26 Mar 2015 | 6:20 pm
    Mr Lee Kuan Yew, the man responsible for making modern Singapore what it is today, passed away on 23 March 2015, aged 91. Incidentally it was also Emmy Noether’s birthday. I have wanted to start off my class by showing the google doodle but the lesson plan had to change in view of the more sombre and relevant news. The mathematical exploits and Emmy and Sophie will have to wait for another day. Throughout this whole week of national mourning, much have been wrote about his sagely advice. In particular, the current minister of defence said that Mr Lee often reminded the younger ministers…
  • Kobon Triangles

    tpc
    2 Feb 2015 | 7:44 pm
    Students occasionally have great ideas. Was discussing a problem that originated from some students but was not very well posed. We managed to reformulate it as the maximum number of triangles that can be formed with n lines. This turns out to be well known and already discussed by Gardner who stated that the problem came from Kobon Fujimura. A link to a MAA column by Ed Pegg Jr as well as the OEIS entry. The problem is incidentally still not completely solved.
  • Translate

    tpc
    22 Jan 2015 | 8:59 pm
    It’s slightly old but I only recently saw this article about how Google Translate make use of linear transformation. The new book on my desk eta products and theta series identities has the following quote in the preface. In der Theorie der Thetafunctionen ist es leicht, eine beliebig grosse Menge von Relationen aufzustellen, aber die Schwierigkeit beginnt da, wo es sich darum handelt, aus diesem Labyrinth von Formeln einen Ausweg zu finden. Die Besch¨aftigung mit jenen Formelmassen scheint auf die mathematische Phantasie eine verdorrende Wirkung auszu¨uben – G. Frobenius, 1893…
 
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    WordPress Tag: Mathematics

  • Fourier Series Animation Using Circles

    Eren
    22 Apr 2015 | 5:22 am
  • >Lait condensé>  20150421a Cyberlearning, STEM, Mindfulness & Analytics

    lefouque
    22 Apr 2015 | 5:01 am
    Articles / Resources 01. SRI Report: Impact of Digital Courseware on Student Learning 02. STEM and cyberlearning at Northwestern Uni 03. 7 Cyberlearning Technologies Transforming Education 04. Howard Rheingold’s Net Smart: living mindfully in cyberculture 05. Desiderata and Opportunities for Ed Tech Developers 06. What is missing in STEM talk? 07. Learning analytics and educational data mining in learning discourses 08. Learning Environments: Research, Design, And Implementation 09. Innovating Pedagogy 10. Linking Superheroes and Technology to STEM Aspirations Curated by Lefouque
  • Introduction to Higher Mathematics 3

    James Revels Composer
    22 Apr 2015 | 5:00 am
    Posted by: James Revels III In 8th grade I used to suck at math. I couldn’t even multiply 2 digits with multiple digits let alone decimals, that is until, I met a math teacher who taught us math by forcing us to do it without calculators. It changed my outlook on math forever. As I gained more mastery I began to like it more and more. Know I rarely go a day without using set theory in my music or practicing geometrical constructs using my copy of Euclid’s Elements. So over the next few weeks I will be post the 19 videos I found on Higher Mathematics by Bill Shillito. I hope you…
  • >Lait condensé>  20150422c Improving Education, Mathematics &Well-being

    lefouque
    22 Apr 2015 | 4:56 am
    Articles / Resources 01. Math Improvisation and Argumentation 02. Story of The Greedy Triangle 03. To Advance Education, First Reimagine Society 04. Innovating Pedagogy (Open University) Report 05. Daily Naps for Happier, Less Stressed And Richer You 06. Supporting learning with difficulties 07. Ways to Raise a Happy, Healthy Child 08. Bullying – What can you do about it 09. Heartbreaking Notes From Third Graders 10. ‘Success Kid’ desperate to save Dad Curated by Lefouque
  • Travelogue D6

    anaesthete
    22 Apr 2015 | 3:56 am
    The third day opened, like the one before, in the swaying metro, more open that its Parisian counterparts. After a journey with no few changeovers, I found myself in the lower districts of the Presqu’île where the area proves a strange mix of empty lot and constructions both new and destined for tearing down. In a restaurant off the shopping center, I took my lunch and contemplated the cipher scrawled upon a blackboard to one side of the dining room, a sequence of numbers: 4 5 9 8 16 11 _ . As I have made a habit of the circuitous and searching, I tried out various relations and…
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    Mr. L's Math

  • Daily Minimal – a new minimal design every day

    Bill Lombard
    11 Apr 2015 | 4:23 pm
    Here’s a website showcasing minimalist geometric shapes and patterns. I find myself looking at many of these and seeing a lot of relationships that are not immediately apparent. Also it’s nice to think of extensions that could become GeoGebra apps, which would generalize/customize these nicely done images. Daily Minimal, http://www.dailyminimal.com/, is hosted by (in the author’s own words) “I’m a 19 years old Paris based graphic designer and student in chemistry. DAILY MINIMAL is an art blog dedicated to minimalism and geometry. My main goal is to show all…
  • Pi Day Pics

    Bill Lombard
    10 Mar 2015 | 10:06 am
    Here’s a great set of pictures for math teachers and other pi fans, found at NETWORKWORLD.  This year Pi Day is special, because it happens on 3/14/15, and the decimal representation of pi is 3.1415 . . . Some folks are calling it Pi Day of the Century – we’ll see.
  • Spiral Crosses – a Rotation and Dilation Exercise

    Bill Lombard
    29 Dec 2014 | 12:14 pm
    This is a great exercise for Common Core Geometry instruction in the area of transformations. HINT: highlight a slider’s button, then use your cursor keys for fine adjustment; play around with the numbers to get pleasing shapes. Use slider n for number of iterations Use slider r for rotation in 0.001 increments Use slider d for dilation in 0.001 increments Build command structure in 3 steps: Enter Dilate[poly1, d^i], where i = 1, 2, 3 to find pattern Enter Rotate[Dilate[poly1, d^i], i r π], where i = 1, 2, 3 to find pattern Enter Sequence[Rotate[Dilate[poly1, d^i], i r π], i, 1, n, 1]…
  • Polygons and Diagonals

    Bill Lombard
    29 Dec 2014 | 11:15 am
    Number of diagonals in a polygon: If n = number of vertex points, then D = number of diagonals = n(n-3)/2. Slider n controls the number as well as the color. In the Advanced tab, Red = n / 36, Green = 1 – n / 36, and Blue = 0, so the color changes from Green to Red as the number of sides moves from 3 to 36. reference: I modified sonom’s idea from http://tube.geogebra.org/material/show/id/137056 The downloadable file can be found here. My other GeoGebraTube apps can be found here
  • Spirograph-Epitrochoid Earth and Moon

    Bill Lombard
    29 Dec 2014 | 10:47 am
    An epitrochoid is the path traced by a point on a circle (M) that travels on the outside of another circle (E). This can be used to model the path of the Moon (M) in orbit around the Earth (E). There are about 13.3 revolutions(n) of the Moon about the Earth in one year. -credit-Malin Christersson-http://www.geogebratube.org/material/show/id/87141 The downloadable file can be found here. My other GeoGebraTube apps can be found here
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    Institute for Mathematics and Computer Science

  • 11-Year-Old Davidson Young Scholar Scores Perfect 800 on SAT Math Test

    IMACS Staff Writer
    8 Apr 2015 | 10:00 pm
    IMACS student Shiva Oswal and his parents pose in front of the magnificent Atlantis Hotel on a family trip to Dubai. When fewer than 1% of 2014 college-bound high school seniors attain a perfect 800 on the math section of the SAT, you know that you’ve met someone special when he’s achieved that amazing feat before even cracking the teen years. That someone is Shiva Oswal, a precocious 11-year-old from Northern California who recently earned that lofty score as part of a program through Johns Hopkins’ Center for Talented Youth (CTY) called the Julian C.
  • Three Tips for Nurturing the Good Habit of Delayed Gratification

    IMACS Staff Writer
    12 Mar 2015 | 6:50 am
    The ability to delay gratification has been shown in various studies to be a strong predictor of academic success, even more so than IQ. Can parents help nurture this ability in children? Yes! But it takes more than a didactic approach. Many parents are probably familiar with the famous marshmallow experiment where young children were given a choice between one marshmallow now or two if they could wait 15 minutes. It’s helpful to recall that the original experiment focused not on whether the children could wait but rather on what strategies helped them to wait. Rochester University…
  • Not Your Father’s Algebra: A New Online Course for Talented Students

    IMACS Staff Writer
    11 Feb 2015 | 10:00 pm
    EMF teaches modern algebra, which has important applications in public-key cryptography. The Institute for Mathematics and Computer Science (IMACS) recently released its first online algebra course, Algebra: Groups, Rings and Fields. This is the tenth course in the Elements of Mathematics: Foundations (EMF) program for talented secondary school students. Our latest self-paced offering has generated a fair amount of inquiries from parents seeking options for their mathematically advanced child. The answers to some of those questions can be found in the FAQ at elementsofmathematics.com. IMACS…
  • Which Computer Programming Language Should My Child Learn?

    IMACS Staff Writer
    14 Jan 2015 | 10:00 pm
    The "learn to code" movement has emphasized teaching computer programming to children, and so many parents are asking, "Which language should my child learn?" It’s easy to be overwhelmed by the myriad choices: Java, Python, Ruby, C++, Objective-C, and so on. Ten years ago, the list of languages would have been different, but the question would still have been the same. So instead of focusing on learning a particular language that is popular at the moment and wondering if it’s the "right" choice, consider that your child would benefit most from…
  • Improving Math Education through History

    IMACS Staff Writer
    17 Dec 2014 | 10:00 pm
    A recent study published in the Philosophy of Mathematics Education Journal confirms that teachers’ images of mathematics and their mathematics history knowledge are interlinked. According to the study’s lead author, Danielle Goodwin of the Institute for Mathematics and Computer Science (IMACS), "By and large, the teachers with low history scores in this study were the teachers who exhibited narrow, negative views of mathematics." Key findings from the study include: Respondents with low history scores were more likely to indicate that they believed mathematics overall…
 
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    mathrecreation

  • octagonal iteration with GSP

    Dan MacKinnon
    14 Apr 2015 | 6:51 pm
    Here is a little GSP iteration that I came across that I thought was worth sharing.Start with a line segment - this provides the only "free" points in the sketch - everything else is constructed on top of this, starting with a square based on AB.Next, construct the center of the square, and a circle centered on that square's center and diameter equal to the diagonal of the square.Next, construct points on the circle midway between the points provided by the corners of the squares.We'll iterate by mapping the original line segment onto pairs of these points (in GSP you can select the free…
  • are you experienced?

    Dan MacKinnon
    25 Mar 2015 | 7:52 pm
    Don't despairA search for "math" in the iTunes store is likely to disappoint (maybe "maths" or "mathematics" would provide better results). I haven't tried Math Drills Lite - it is likely the last thing I would want to download, yet it comes up first.A sad situationBut this is happy post, because there is a math app, well, more of an interactive book, that is engaging, interesting, well written, and attractively designed, that conveys mathematics as its practitioners and enthusiasts see it: beautiful and creative, not dry and confusing. Mathema, written by two…
  • a tile arrangement, or airport fun

    Dan MacKinnon
    19 Mar 2015 | 7:57 pm
    Is there anything nicer than a notebook with grid-lined pages? Maybe, but they are pretty nice - and I count myself very fortunate to have just obtained a new one. And thanks mostly to a longish wait in the Vancouver airport, this is what ended up on page one.The image on the tiles are the simplest non-trivial knot, the trefoil, which you could also put together using these other tiles.Along a given row or column (following the slight skew), the tiles are alternately rotated back and forth by 90 degrees - in the rows they alternate between being placed at 0 and 90 degrees or at 270 and…
  • season's greetings

    Dan MacKinnon
    11 Mar 2015 | 7:39 pm
  • bus number factoring

    Dan MacKinnon
    27 Jan 2015 | 7:09 pm
    Each bus in Ottawa has a four digit number that identifies it (like 4476 above). One thing to do while riding, if you don't have a bus transfer to play with, is to pass the time factoring that bus identifier (it's also printed on the inside of the bus, in case you miss it getting in).We all know some basic divisibility rules to help with factoring: If it ends in a zero, it's divisible by 10, if it's even then its divisible by 2, if it ends in a 5 then it's divisible by 5. You may know that if the last two digits of a number are divisible by 4 then the whole number is also divisible by 4…
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    Math-Blog

  • Review of Stat-Spotting: A Field Guide to Identifying Dubious Data

    John F. McGowan, Ph.D.
    13 Apr 2015 | 6:00 am
    Stat-Spotting: A Field Guide to Identifying Dubious Data Joel Best University of California Press Berkeley and Los Angeles, California 2008, updated 2013 158 pages (Paperback) My Rating: 4/5 Introduction Stat-Spotting: A Field Guide to Identifying Dubious Data by Joel Best, author of Damned Lies and Statistics and More Damned Lies and Statistics, is a detailed, practical handbook of warning signs for false or misleading numbers and statistics and in some cases methods to determine if the numbers and statistics are false or misleading. We can say that a number or statistic is misleading if the…
  • Review of More Damned Lies and Statistics: How Numbers Confuse Public Issues

    John F. McGowan, Ph.D.
    6 Apr 2015 | 6:00 am
    More Damned Lies and Statistics: How Numbers Confuse Public Issues By Joel Best University of California Press Hardcover, 217 pages ISBN: 9780520238305 September 2004 $29.95, £19.95 My Rating: 3/5 Introduction In this new world of Big Data, Data Science, and the computing power of a 1980’s Cray supercomputer in every pocket, we are inundated with more and more statistics and mathematical models based on more and more “data.” This torrent of real science and pseudoscience (sometimes officially sanctioned) includes the dubious financial models that contributed to the 2008…
  • Measuring Up, SAT Scores, and Coding Interviews

    John F. McGowan, Ph.D.
    16 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    Introduction Measuring Up: What Educational Testing Really Tells Us is a 2008 book by Professor Daniel Koretz of Harvard. Koretz, the Henry Lee Shattuck Professor of Education at Harvard, is a noted expert on educational assessment and testing policy. Professor Koretz is both an excellent writer and also public speaker as evidenced by many short videos at BigThink and YouTube. Measuring Up is an “accessible” book that tries and mostly succeeds in teaching the basic concepts, both statistical and testing specific, of educational achievement tests such as the SAT (the test formerly…
  • Review of Damned Lies and Statistics: Untangling Numbers from the Media, Politicians, and Activists

    John F. McGowan, Ph.D.
    9 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    DAMNED LIES AND STATISTICS: Untangling Numbers from the Media, Politicians, and Activists (UPDATED EDITION) Joel Best University of California Press Berkeley and Los Angeles, California 2001, 2012 Print Length: 213 pages My Rating: 4/5 Introduction Damned Lies and Statistics is an excellent book on the misuse of statistics by Joel Best, a Professor of Sociology and Criminal Justice at the University of Delaware. Lies was first published in 2001 and updated in 2012. There is also a sequel More Damned Lies and Statistics: How Numbers Confuse Public Issues. Lies gives many examples of bad…
  • Book Review: e: the Story of a Number

    John F. McGowan, Ph.D.
    16 Feb 2015 | 6:00 am
    e: The Story of a Number by Eli Maor Princeton Science Library Series Published by Princeton University Press, 41 William Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 Copyright © 1994 by Princeton University Press Page Count: 248 pages My Rating: 4/5 Introduction e: The Story of a Number is a book about e (2.718281828459045…), sometimes known as Euler’s Number or Euler’s Constant after the great mathematician Leonhard Euler. e: The Story of a Number is an “accessible” math book, rather than a “popular” math book, that tries to teach an advanced topic (really…
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    CSE Blog - quant, math, computer science puzzles

  • (Advanced) Cheryl's Birthday Puzzle

    Pratik Poddar
    15 Apr 2015 | 11:01 am
    Source: Sent to me by Prateek Chandra Jha (IIT Bombay) Problem: This problem is inspired by the Cheryl's Birthday Puzzle (FB Post, Guardian Link). Paul, Sam and Dean are assigned the task of figuring out two numbers. They get the following information: Both numbers are integers between (including) 1 and 1000 Both numbers may also be identical. Paul is told the product of the two numbers, Sam the sum and Dean the difference. After receiving their number, the following conversation takes place: Paul: I do not know the two numbers. Sam: You did not have to tell me that, I already knew that.
  • Dividing Pizza with a Clock

    Pratik Poddar
    5 Mar 2015 | 9:47 pm
    Source: Alok Goyal Puzzle Page ( http://alokgoyal1971.com/ ) . Alok is ex-IIT Delhi, Partner at Helion VC Problem: Part I (Easy): Using a clock, divide a pizza among 12 people Part II (Difficult): Using a clock, divide a pizza among 11 people?
  • Buying in Rocket Ships and Selling in Fire Sale

    Pratik Poddar
    18 Feb 2015 | 5:11 am
    Source: Asked to me by Ankush Jain (CSE IITB 2011, Morgan Stanley Quant Associate). He took it from Algorithms Design book by Tardos and Kleinberg Problem: Easy case: You’re trying to buy equipments whose costs are appreciating. Item i appreciates at a rate of r_i > 1 per month, starting from $100, so if you buy it t months from now you will pay 100*((r_i)^t). If you can only buy one item per month, what is the optimal order in which to buy them? Difficult case: You’re trying to sell equipments whose costs are depreciating. Item i depreciates at…
  • Box in Box problem

    Pratik Poddar
    23 Jan 2015 | 2:31 am
    Source: Sent to me by Sudeep Kamath Problem: Airline check-in baggage has size restriction by ​so-called ​linear dimension: length + breadth + height should not exceed 62 inches. Prove that you can't "cheat" by packing a box with higher linear dimension into a box with ​lower​ linear dimension.
  • Fibonacci Multiple Puzzle

    Pratik Poddar
    21 Jan 2015 | 2:30 am
    Source: Mailed to me by Kushagra Singhal, Ex-IIT Kanpur, PhD Student at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Problem: Prove that for any positive K and a natural number n, every (n*K)th number in the Fibonacci sequence is a multiple of the Kth number in the Fibonacci sequence. More formally, for any natural number n, let F(n) denote Fibonacci number n. That is, F(0) = 0, F(1) = 1, and F(n+2) = F(n+1) + F(n). Prove that for any positive K and natural n, F(n*K) is a multiple of F(K).
 
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    Motion Math

  • Say “Wrong answer” while encouraging growth mindsets

    Jacob
    22 Apr 2015 | 1:57 am
    One of the great advantages of digital learning tools is the ability to give learners immediate feedback, including negative feedback. Whether a student sees negative feedback as a final judgement on their lack of ability (a fixed mindset) or rather as a useful learning opportunity (a growth mindset) makes a world of difference. In our game designs, we’ve aimed to avoid big red X’s or harsh sounds in response to wrong answers, so as not to be discouraging. In our latest game Motion Math: Cupcake!, we’ve gone a step further, thanks to the advice of our advisor, Professor Jo…
  • Motion Math: Cupcake! Edu and our Classroom Cupcake Contest

    Jacob
    21 Apr 2015 | 10:57 am
    Today we’ve released the classroom version of our new game: Motion Math: Cupcake! Edu. Students create their own cupcake delivery business, learning about the coordinate system, unit rates, pricing, and diverse word problems. (More details on the game and relevant standards here.) Plus, Cupcake! Edu connects to your Motion Math teacher dashboard so you can use it as a formative assessment tool. To play Cupcake for free in your classroom: Sign up for a free Motion Math Educator trial account. Download the free Motion Math: Cupcake! Edu app onto your classroom iPads. We’re also…
  • Delicious! Motion Math: Cupcake has arrived

    Jacob
    16 Apr 2015 | 6:14 am
    Our new game Motion Math: Cupcake! has just launched on the App Store! We’ve taken the concept of building a business, which kids loved in Motion Math: Pizza!, and added even more rich math. Players grow a cupcake delivery shop by buying ingredients, designing and pricing cupcakes, solving diverse word problems, and delivering to customers by navigating a coordinate system. Many students struggle with decoding sentences such as “I’m having dinner with 3 friends and we’ll each want 2 cupcakes.” The world of Cupcake is a delightful context for mastering this…
  • Motion Math: Cupcake!

    Jacob
    8 Apr 2015 | 11:34 pm
    Navigate the road to sweet success!In Motion Math: Cupcake! (for iPad, iPad mini, iPhone, and iPod touch) you run a cupcake delivery business, learning about word problems, proportions, mental math, and the coordinate system as you buy ingredients, design cupcakes, set prices, and deliver to customers.Get it today! (Or, if you have a Motion Math Educator account, download the classroom version here.) • Ages 8 and up • For iPad, iPad mini, iPhone, iPod touch • In English, Spanish, French • Proportions, Word Problems, Coordinates, Mixed numbers, Chart-reading Love I couldn’t…
  • Yes! Cool! I did it! Look!

    Jacob
    26 Mar 2015 | 11:31 am
    We recently participated in the NYC Innovation Zone’s Short Cycle Challenge, piloting the Motion Math Educator in the 4th grade classrooms of teachers Helen Bruno-Raccuia, Jackie Hickman, and Cris Curatolo of P.S. 30 Westerleigh School in Staten Island. Here, Helen describes our collaboration: Thank you Helen, Jackie, Cris, and your students for all your great feedback!
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